Treasure Hunt in the Garden

Last night after returning from a few days in Ohio, the boys and I proceeded to investigate the garden to prepare for today’s delivery. As I was walking to the garden, the boys came running with excitement. They told me to hurry for they had found something! I was pleasantly surprised to find many garden treasurers unveiled from squash to pumpkins to tomatoes and broccoli.

Keith and Sam showing me the summer squash medley they found.

Both Keith and Sam were filled with so much excitement as they ran around the garden exclaiming, “This is just like an Easter egg hunt. This is so much fun!!” That is why I garden, and why we started the CSA: to help our children learn and grow, to reap the rewards of their efforts, to share the bounty with others and to discover the amazing miracles that happen with Mother Nature. There is such joy to see this unfold with them.

Spaghetti squash growing.

Sam and Keith looking for cucumbers. We installed fencing in the garden last week for the vines to climb. This will allow us to utilize the space more efficiently and allow the cucumbers to grow down through the fencing.

These broccoli we started from seed under peanut butter containers with holes drilled in the top. Unfortunately, not all of them survived the June storms. It sure is a stunning looking vegetable.

Several varieties of lettuce are thriving in the new pallet gardens. Hope they are ready to harvest next week with all of this heat and humidity.

The boys found all five varieties of tomatoes were producing green tomatoes. Now we need to wait for them to ripen.

Potato bugs are a major pest for us. Over the years, we have consulted with Master Gardeners and U of M soil scientists. We have used insecticide we can purchase off the shelf, and we have used organic insecticides. Nothing has worked to effectively control them. This year, Steve applied for his pesticide applicator license, took a very detailed test, and this year we have used an insecticide that I personally feel is far safer for my family then what we have bought off the shelf. We will constantly search for improved ways to control them. If we did not spray, we would not have NO potatoes. We log when we spray, and weather conditions at application. If you would prefer not to have them because we use the insecticide, please let us know. We fully respect your right to choose.

Potato bugs are a major pest for us. Over the years, we have consulted with Master Gardeners and U of M soil scientists. We have used insecticide purchased off the shelf in the garden supply section, and we have used organic methods. Nothing has worked to effectively control them. This year, Steve applied for his pesticide applicator license and took a very detailed test for us to purchase a different insecticide to control the potato bugs. I personally feel this is far safer for my family then what we have bought off the shelf. We will constantly search for improved ways to control them. If we did not spray, we would have NO potatoes. We log when we spray and weather conditions at application. If you would prefer not to have potatoes because we use the insecticide, please let us know. We fully respect your right to choose. Please understand that as a mother and someone who has worked in agriculture, I know the stringent tests that all pesticides (insecticides) undergo before farmers can use them. For more information go to: http://www.extension.umn.edu/pesticides/private.html or to http://www.bestfoodfacts.org/main/food_for_thought/0/10

BOXES OF PRODUCE

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list.

Look for new links on recipes etc. Also remember food safety when preparing, always wash your before eating. http://bit.ly/MBhskn

Rhubarb – We will not have any this week, but am hoping for one more harvest next week.

Black Seeded Simpson Lettuce – Wash, cut off longer stems. These plants are struggling to recover from the storms. Our second and third plantings of salad crops took a beating. We have replanted. With this heat and humidity, we hope to have spinach and several varieties of lettuce very shortly.

Simpson Elite Lettuce – Wash, cut off longer stems. Should grow better in warmer weather with better flavor.

Prizehead Lettuce – Wash, cut off longer stems. Should be tender and tasty!

Beets –  We are thinning out the rows so the bulbs have more room to grow, so enjoy these small beautiful red bulbs.

Carrots – Enjoy some fresh garden carrots!

Peas – The pods are edible so enjoy eating them out of the pod or the pod and all.

Green Beans – This is our first harvest out of the garden this year. We will see how long they last in this heat and humidity.  http://www.marthastewart.com/search/apachesolr_search/green%20beans

Summer Squash – Check out Martha Stewart’s site for recipes.  http://www.marthastewart.com/search/apachesolr_search/using%20summer%20squash

Herbs – Chives, Red  Rubin basil, mint, parsley and golden oregano. Remember you can dry them or you can freeze in an ice cube to use later.

Fresh cut arrangement

2 thoughts on “Treasure Hunt in the Garden

  1. Here is an Almond Rhubarb cake

    Almond Rhubarb Coffee Cake

    Rated:
    Submitted By: Neris
    Photo By: LUSENDA
    Prep Time: 15 Minutes
    Cook Time: 30 Minutes
    Ready In: 45 Minutes
    Servings: 24
    “This cake is sweet and almondy with rhubarb delectability.”
    INGREDIENTS:
    1 1/2 cups packed brown sugar
    2/3 cup vegetable oil
    1 egg
    1 teaspoon vanilla extract
    2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
    1 teaspoon salt
    1 teaspoon baking soda
    1 cup milk
    1 1/2 cups rhubarb, chopped
    1/2 cup sliced almonds
    1/3 cup white sugar
    1 tablespoon butter, melted
    1/4 cup sliced almonds
    DIRECTIONS:
    1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C). Grease two 9 inch round pans.
    2. In a large bowl, beat brown sugar, oil, egg, and vanilla together until smooth. Combine flour, salt and baking soda; add to sugar mixture alternately with milk. Beat until smooth. Stir in rhubarb and 1/2 cup almonds. Pour into prepared pans.
    3. In a small bowl, combine white sugar and butter or margarine. Stir in 1/4 cup almonds. Sprinkle topping over batter.
    4. Bake for 30 to 35 minutes, or until the cake tests done.

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