Joyful Surprises Within

Joyful Surprises Within

Our weekend was spent weeding and getting the garden “under control.” We also planted the final round of crops for the season. While working in each area, we were pleased to see different pumpkins, squash and gourds growing. It truly is fun to see natures beauty unveiled from egg plant to peppers to cucumbers and potatoes. There are a lot of joyful surprises within. Sometimes you just need to look a little harder.

This week, we hope you to find joyful surprises within. “A joyful heart is good medicine, but a crushed spirit dries up the bones.” – Proverbs 17:22

Garden Science

This week was fair week for the boys…virtual fair week that is. It did not deter Keith from entering a vegetable box consisting of peas, green beans, beets, kohlrabi, carrots and summer squash. Honestly, pulling together a uniform box of vegetables is a time consuming process. We are proud of him for making this effort.

Pick-Up and Delivery

  • Remember that pick-up and deliveries will be on the schedule you have arranged with Harner Brothers CSA – please note the exceptions to this which were in the email. Please follow the CDC and MDH guidelines and COVID-19 procedures in email.
  • It is your responsibility to know that the pick-up or drop-off time will occur at the agreed upon time, and it is your responsibility as a shareholder to know this and be responsible for the produce at that time. If you are unable to utilize your share that week, it is still your responsibility: find someone else to pick it up or donate it to the food shelf.
  • Each box is labeled for each family. The same boxes will be used for your family throughout the season. Boxes and containers should be returned the following week. Bags will only be used once.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

Outrageous Red Lettuce and Black Seeded Simpson – So grateful this crop seems to thrive on dry weather. Lovely color for sandwiches and salads.

Carrots – A few to enjoy raw, in a salad or in a fresh cooked veggie dish. When they are fresh out of the garden like this, I don’t worry about peeling. I simply wash and eat raw or slice and add to a salad.

Purple Kohlrabi – love the color.

Kohlrabi – Two varieties this week: purple and giant duke. Cut off the bottom and the top, peel them and cut up like an apple. I love to eat them dipped in peanut butter.

OnionsEnjoy the Patterson, purple or Walla Walla onions in your boxes.

Super Sugar Snap Peas – Second planting of this crop – Eat the pods and peas all together. Eat raw or sautee. Great snack.

Detroit Dark Red Beets – The entire plant is edible – that includes the leaves. Here are some ideas from Martha Stewart on how to use your beets.

Cucumbers

Cucumbers – I don’t know about you, but I love the smell of cucumbers. This joyous vegetable is coming into its own. Enjoy with or without the skin on.

Green Beans – The first crop struggled to get out of the ground. We have a few subsequent crops that are coming into their own.

Sunburst Patty Pan Summer Squash – Sunburst is a beautiful butter yellow scallop-type squash. Each fruit is accented with a small dark green ring. The mild, white flesh remains tender and firm. Best used when harvested and eaten at around 3″ across. Here are some ways from Martha Stewart to use and prepare this vegetable.

Zucchini – Wash the zucchini and eat with or without the skin on. Here are a few ways to use it.

Potatoes – Yukon Gold’s buttery flavor ads wonderful color to any meal whether you bake or cook it. Check out this week’s recipe below.

Some of you have taken these plants home and rooted them into a pot. Some are taking them home and making pesto. Thank you for sharing your ideas!

Basil – An herb I enjoy using when grilling or making tomato sauce. Learn from Martha Stewart some tips and tricks.

Cilantro – Wash and enjoy. Freeze extra by placing in ice cube trays and running water over them and freeze. A good way to use later in soups and other dishes. Check out these ideas from Martha Stewart on how to use this herb.

A beautiful array of colors this week to chose from. We hope they brighten your dat.

Arrangement – A variety of flowers including lilies and zinnias.

Recipe of the Week

Sliced Potatoes

  • 4-6 large potatoes, washed and scrubbed
  • 2 Tablespoons olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • Salt and pepper to taste
  1. Cover the grate of the grill with aluminum foil.
  2. Turn the grill on to preheat. 
  3. Cut potatoes into ⅓’ or ½’ wedges.
  4. Brush potato slices with olive oil and sprinkle with dried thyme and dried oregano.
  5. Lay potato wedges over aluminum foil on the grill.
  6. Sprinkle with salt and pepper to taste.
  7. Grill wedges to desired tenderness, turning occasionally.

 

Attitude of Gratitude

Attitude of Gratitude

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Blessings come when you least expect it. The attitude of gratitude was obvious to me the past 24 hours.

  1. Today’s beginning was so beautiful, watching the fog come off the fields and the sun rise. It’s important in life to stop and take in the beauty that surrounds us.
  2. After last night’s baseball games, I thought for sure the last thing the boys would want to do is harvest zucchini and be in the garden. To my surprise, it was an absolute beautiful evening with smiles on everyone’s faces.
  3. This evening, a flower had fallen out of one of the flower arrangements. Just as I suggested that it be picked up, it was stepped on. To my surprise, it didn’t phase the flower. It still looked flawless. Moral of the story: Even if you feel like your getting stepped on by something enormous, bounce back and be beautiful – that’s what God made you to be.
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Smiles all around as the sun was setting last night. God’s light was shining through their smiles.

Garden Science

Japanese beetles are a real nuisance in the garden this year. Eating leaves and flowers and decimating plants.

 Pick-Up and Delivery

  • Remember that pick-up and deliveries will be on the schedule you have arranged with Harner Brothers CSA – please note the exceptions to this which were in the email. Please follow the CDC and MDH guidelines and COVID-19 procedures in email.
  • It is your responsibility to know that the pick-up or drop-off time will occur at the agreed upon time, and it is your responsibility as a shareholder to know this and be responsible for the produce at that time. If you are unable to utilize your share that week, it is still your responsibility: find someone else to pick it up or donate it to the food shelf.
  • Each box is labeled for each family. The same boxes will be used for your family throughout the season. Boxes and containers should be returned the following week. Bags will only be used once.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

Outrageous Red Lettuce and Black Seeded Simpson – So grateful this crop seems to thrive on dry weather. Lovely color for sandwiches and salads.

Carrots – A few to enjoy raw, in a salad or in a fresh cooked veggie dish. When they are fresh out of the garden like this, I don’t worry about peeling. I simply wash and eat raw or slice and add to a salad. 

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Purple Kohlrabi – love the color.

Kohlrabi – Two varieties this week: purple and giant duke. Cut off the bottom and the top, peel them and cut up like an apple. I love to eat them dipped in peanut butter.

 Radishes – A few – the heat may have made them a bit tangy – with a bite to them. We are nearing the end of this crop. 

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I just love the braided look on the stem of the onion.

Onions Enjoy the Patterson or Walla Walla onions in your boxes.

wp-1594835066988.jpgSunburst Patty Pan Summer SquashSunburst is a beautiful butter yellow scallop-type squash. Each fruit is accented with a small dark green ring. The mild, white flesh remains tender and firm. Best used when harvested and eaten at around 3″ across. Here are some ways from Martha Stewart to use and prepare this vegetable.

ZucchiniWash the zucchini and eat with or without the skin on. Here are a few ways to use it.

wp-1594181892702.jpgCucumbersI don’t know about you but I love the smell of cucumbers. This joyous vegetable is coming into its own. Enjoy with or without the skin on.

Green Beans – The first crop struggled to get out of the ground. We have a few subsequent crops that are coming into their own.

Super Sugar Snap Peas – Eat the pods and peas all together. This is the end of the first crop. The second crop looks like it just started to get some pods on it. 

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Beets are a favorite of mine. Some like to peel and cut up and eat raw. I prefer mine cooked with a dab of butter.

Detroit Dark Red Beets – The entire plant is edible – that includes the leaves. Here are some ideas from Martha Stewart on how to use your beets.

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Some of you have taken these plants home and rooted them into a pot. Some are taking them home and making pesto. Thank you for sharing your ideas!

Basil – An herb I enjoy using when grilling or making tomato sauce. Learn from Martha Stewart some tips and tricks.

Cilantro – Wash and enjoy. Freeze extra by placing in ice cube trays and running water over them and freeze. A good way to use later in soups and other dishes. Check out these ideas from Martha Stewart on how to use this herb.

wp-15948350657616710347622166616183.jpgPotatoes – The Dark Red Norland variety is great for cooking, roasting or on the grill. These fresh out of the ground potatoes cook up faster than others you buy. Simply because they are newly harvested. Check out this week’s recipe below.

Flower Arrangement – A variety of flowers including lilies and zinnias.

Recipe of the Week

Roasted New Potatoes

The small new potatoes work great for this dish, all you have to do is cut them in half. Otherwise cut the larger new potatoes into 1 1/2-inch chunks. No need to peel.

Prep time: 10 minutes

Cook time: 40 minutes

Yield: Serves 4-6

1 1/2 pounds of smallish new potatoes (red or yellow skinned), cleaned, cut in half or quarters

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

2 cloves garlic, minced (about 2 teaspoons)

1-2 teaspoons fresh rosemary, minced

1/4 teaspoon Kosher salt

Freshly ground black pepper to taste

1 Preheat oven to 450°Fahrenheit. Place potatoes in a large bowl. Sprinkle with salt and pepper, olive oil, rosemary, and garlic. Toss until potatoes are well coated with everything.

2 Spread the potatoes out on a single layer of a roasting pan (a sturdy pan that can take high oven heat, a standard cookie sheet may warp). Roast for 40 minutes, or until potatoes are cooked through and browned. Serve immediately.

Source: Simply Recipes

Angels Within

Angels Within

As we returned home from our travels around the 4th of July and over the weekend, the weeds had found a new foothold and had once again felt like they were “taking over.” This is quite frustrating when you try to manage the pests appropriately so the crops can thrive.

But while I was weeding, the story of the “The Parable of the Weeds” from Mathew 13:24-43 came to mind. The story basically boils down to my comparative…the weeds are from the devil, and the crops are angels sent to earth to do good will – nourishing others. I recognize that this is an interpretation into a larger lesson. But what I can tell you, it is like seeing angels when you see the crop with no weeds in it.

The good news…we are seeing new vegetables on the verge of harvest such as green tomatoes,  cucumbers and summer squash. So here’s hoping to seeing more angels within the garden.

Garden Science

In my hast last week, I neglected to post this. We had over 4 1/2 inches of rain on June 29. It is interesting to watch Mother Nature. Showers us with moisture and parches us with heat and humidity. We pray for rain.

Pick-Up and Delivery

  • Remember that pick-up and deliveries will be on the schedule you have arranged with Harner Brothers CSA – please note the exceptions to this which were in the email. Please follow the CDC and MDH guidelines and COVID-19 procedures in email.
  • It is your responsibility to know that the pick-up or drop-off time will occur at the agreed upon time, and it is your responsibility as a shareholder to know this and be responsible for the produce at that time. If you are unable to utilize your share that week, it is still your responsibility: find someone else to pick it up or donate it to the food shelf.
  • Each box is labeled for each family. The same boxes will be used for your family throughout the season. Boxes and containers should be returned the following week. Bags will only be used once.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

Outrageous Red Lettuce – So grateful this crop seems to thrive on dry weather. Lovely color for sandwiches and salads.

Spinach – The first crop has seen its last harvest. The second crop has been parched by the sun this week so we are watering it and seeing what next week will bring. Some beet greens are also mixed in with this.

Carrots are a wonderful root vegetable. Place in your refrigerator and eat raw or cooked.

Carrots – A few to enjoy raw, in a salad or in a fresh cooked veggie dish. When they are fresh out of the garden like this, I don’t worry about peeling. I simply wash and eat raw or slice and add to a salad.

Purple Kohlrabi – love the color.

Kohlrabi – Two varieties this week: purple and giant duke. Cut off the bottom and the top, peel them and cut up like an apple. I love to eat them dipped in peanut butter.

 Radishes – A few – the heat may have made them a bit tangy – with a bite to them.

 Onions  Enjoy the Patterson or Walla Walla onions in your boxes.

Super Sugar Snap Peas – Boy did this crop hit its peak this week.

 Super Sugar Snap Peas – Eat the pods and peas all together. Great snack.

Detroit Dark Red Beets – The entire plant is edible – that includes the leaves. Here are some ideas from Martha Stewart on how to use your beets.

Basil – An herb I enjoy using when grilling or making tomato sauce. Learn from Martha Stewart some tips and tricks.

Cilantro – Wash and enjoy. Freeze extra by placing in ice cube trays and running water over them and freeze. A good way to use later in soups and other dishes. Check out these ideas from Martha Stewart on how to use this herb.

The colors were so beautiful this week.

Flower Arrangement– A variety of flowers including lilies and zinnias.

Recipe of the Week

Sugar Snap Peas with Sesame Seeds

Nutty sesame oil balances the sparkle of fresh ginger. A combo of black and white sesame seeds makes for striking presentation, but if you can’t find the black ones, just use 2 teaspoons of white seeds. Prep time:  20 mins .

3 cups fresh sugar snap peas (about 12 ounces) or frozen loose-pack sugar snap peas

1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger

2 teaspoons butter

1 ½ teaspoons toasted sesame oil

½ teaspoon salt

⅛ teaspoon ground black pepper

1 teaspoon white sesame seeds, toasted

1 teaspoon black sesame seeds

Remove strings and tips from fresh peas. Cook fresh peas, covered, in a small amount of boiling salted water for 3 to 5 minutes or until crisp-tender. (Or, cook frozen peas according to package directions.) Drain well. Transfer peas to a large bowl; set aside.

In a small saucepan, cook ginger in hot butter for 1 minute. Remove from heat. Stir in toasted sesame oil, salt and pepper. Pour butter mixture over hot cooked peas; toss to coat. Sprinkle with sesame seeds. Serve warm, at room temperature or chilled.

Source: Midwest Living

The Other Side of the Fence

The Other Side of the Fence

In life, it is so easy to view things from our perspective. This week while weeding the peas, I was reminded of such a valuable life lesson.

As I was weeding, I noticed that if I went to the other side of the fence and weeded the opposite side (the side that was not in the order I intended to go) that the process was a lot faster and easier to weed. So in other words, I got up walked around the fence and got outside of the box and out of my intended organized order.

I was reminded of how important it is to look around, see issues in different angles and look for different solutions to challenges. Many times solutions are right in front of us, we just need to make the effort to see it from a different perspective.

So, this week as we celebrate the birthday of our nation. I encourage you to take time to pause, walk to the other side of the fence, see life from a renewed perspective, count our blessings and reflect how very blessed we are to live in the United States of America.

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Take time to take a look at life from a different perspective and celebrate the many blessings of living in the United States of America.

Pick-Up and Delivery

  • Remember that pick-up and deliveries will be on the schedule you have arranged with Harner Brothers CSA – please note the exceptions to this which were in the email. Please follow the CDC and MDH guidelines and COVID-19 procedures in email.
  • It is your responsibility to know that the pick-up or drop-off time will occur at the agreed upon time, and it is your responsibility as a shareholder to know this and be responsible for the produce at that time. If you are unable to utilize your share that week, it is still your responsibility: find someone else to pick it up or donate it to the food shelf.
  • Each box is labeled for each family. The same boxes will be used for your family throughout the season. Boxes and containers should be returned the following week. Bags will only be used once.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

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Spinach can be harvested many times from the same crop. You cut the leaves off of the plant, and they grow back. So we get several harvests from one planting.

Spinach – Love this mixed into a salad with other greens or as a standalone by itself.

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Carrots are a wonderful root vegetable. Place in your refrigerator and eat raw or cooked.

Carrots – A few to enjoy raw, in a salad or in a fresh cooked veggie dish. When they are fresh out of the garden like this, I don’t worry about peeling. I simply wash and eat raw or slice and add to a salad.

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Giant Duke Kohlrabi – eat like an apple or slice and dip in peanut butter.

Kohlrabi – Two varieties this week: purple and giant duke. Cut off the bottom and the top, peel them and cut up like an apple. I love to eat them dipped in peanut butter.

Radishes – A new crop of radishes this week. Eat raw or cut them up and add them to a hot dish. They may be a bit hot tasting due to the hotter weather. Hot weather brings out a little kick to this vegetable. Cooler weather presents a milder taste.

Spring Onions Spring onions have white bulbs, but they can also have purple or yellow bulbs. Unlike mature onions, which are usually dried, spring onions should be refrigerated. Although the raw bulbs of spring onions have more bite and a stronger flavor than scallions, when sliced thickly and sautéed until tender, they become markedly sweet. Spring onions can also be roasted whole, used in a frittata or soup. Spring onions (both the white part and the green stalks) are great in stir-fry dishes.

Super Sugar Snap Peas – Eat the pods and peas all together. Eat raw or sautee. Great snack.

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Beets are a favorite of mine. Some like to peel and cut up and eat raw. I prefer mine cooked with a dab of butter.

Detroit Dark Red Beets – The entire plant is edible – that includes the leaves. Here are some ideas from Martha Stewart on how to use your beets.

Basil – An herb I enjoy using when grilling or making tomato sauce. Learn from Martha Stewart some tips and tricks.

9-3-12 Cilantro

Cilantro

Cilantro – Wash and enjoy. Freeze extra by placing in ice cube trays and running water over them and freeze. A good way to use later in soups and other dishes. Check out these ideas from Martha Stewart on how to use this herb.

hostas

Hostas and Spirea

Arrangement – Hosta leaves in a vase with a variety of flowers including spirea and tiger lilies.

Recipe of the Week

With the choices in your box this week, I would eat the majority of them raw. With the holiday coming up this weekend, you may wanted to try a few of the following options.

Roasted Vegetables from Martha Stewart

Grilled Vegetables from Taste of Home

Hidden Surprises

Hidden Surprises

As the garden grows into another stage, there are wonderful glimpses of surprises peaking through. This week it is super sugar snap peas. Truly a favorite of many.

I think Sam summed it up best when I told him they were growing this week. “Well, I think I’ll have those for breakfast.” Yes, vegetables for breakfast because that is how delectable they are.

Some have told us they like to prepare these peas in a variety of ways, quite honestly, we can’t get past fresh, right off the plant.

Moral of the story: Life is full of hidden surprises. Many times the best surprise may be right in front of you. Make it a great week!

Garden Science

You never know what you will find out here. But one thing you do know, is that you develop a fascination of understanding Mother Nature,from the clouds to the weeds to the insects. Growing your understanding of what our controllables are in life helps us to accept what we cannot control.

Pick-Up and Delivery

  • Remember that pick-up and deliveries will be on the schedule you have arranged with Harner Brothers CSA – please note the exceptions to this which were in the email. Please follow the CDC and MDH guidelines and COVID-19 procedures in email.
  • It is your responsibility to know that the pick-up or drop-off time will occur at the agreed upon time, and it is your responsibility as a shareholder to know this and be responsible for the produce at that time. If you are unable to utilize your share that week, it is still your responsibility: find someone else to pick it up or donate it to the food shelf.
  • Each box is labeled for each family. The same boxes will be used for your family throughout the season. Boxes and containers should be returned the following week. Bags will only be used once.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

First wash the rhubarb, cut off both ends and cut out any damaged parts of the stalk.

Rhubarb – One pound equals about 3 cups. Wash, cut the ends off, cut off any bad parts damaged by wind, chop into 1/4 – 1/2 inch pieces. No need to peel. You can freeze it in a Ziploc bag (no blanching) and use for months to come. Our family loves it in muffins, breads, jam, pie, crisp, sauce and torte.

Spinach – Love this mixed into a salad with other greens or as a standalone by itself.

Carrots are a root crop. You only get one harvest from each seed.

Carrots – A few to enjoy raw, in a salad or in a fresh cooked veggie dish.

Detroit Dark Red BeetsThe entire plant is edible – that includes the leaves. Here are some ideas from Martha Stewart on how to use your beets.

Spring Onions Spring onions have white bulbs, but they can also have purple or yellow bulbs. Unlike mature onions, which are usually dried, spring onions should be refrigerated. Although the raw bulbs of spring onions have more bite and a stronger flavor than scallions, when sliced thickly and sautéed until tender, they become markedly sweet. Spring onions can also be roasted whole, used in a frittata or soup. Spring onions (both the white part and the green stalks) are great in stir-fry dishes.

Super Sugar Snap Peas – Eat the pods and peas all together. Great snack.

Basil – An herb I enjoy using when grilling or making tomato sauce. Learn from Martha Stewart some tips and tricks.

Cilantro – Wash and enjoy. Freeze extra by placing in ice cube trays and running water over them and freeze. A good way to use later in soups and other dishes. Check out these ideas from Martha Stewart on how to use this herb.

Hosta Leaves

Hosta Leaves – Hosta leaves in a vase and it looks so gorgeous!

Recipe of the Week

This is a family favorite. Quite honestly, I make a variety of these jams to last us the entire year.

After the jar is full, use a clean wet wash cloth and wipe off the top of the jar and wipe off any spills on the jar. Tighten up the lid and label your jar. Place in refrigerator to cool the jam down. Place in freezer after a day or two days. Enjoy!

Rhubarb Jam

Mix together and set aside until a juice forms:
6 cups rhubarb sliced into 1/4 to 1/2 inch pieces
3 cups sugar

Next:
Add one can of pie filling (cherry, raspberry, blueberry, strawberry)
Cook these ingredients for 20 minutes.

Remove from heat and add 1 package of 3 oz jello (use Jello that is of the same flavor as the pie filling).

Mix well. Pour into containers. Refrigerate or freeze.

Provide Attention

Provide Attention

We took a bit of a break this weekend to attend a family high school graduation. The break was needed and appreciated. But upon our return, the weeds had grown, and we need to give attention to the garden to ensure the crops continue to thrive. I would compare this part of the plant’s life to toddler stage. The plants are young need the attention, fun to see thrive, give them the attention they need now, and life will be good to them.

So as we look at things that challenge us, I am reminded of Romans 5:3-5. “But we also glory in our sufferings, because we know that suffering produces perseverance; perseverance, character; and character, hope. And hope does not put us to shame, because God’s love has been poured out into our hearts through the Holy Spirit, who has been given to us.”

Hoping you have a week where your efforts produce hope.

Garden Science – Potato Bugs

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Check out what the insects were doing to all of the vine plants this week.

Striped cucumber beetles are eating the vine plants. As you can see, they will eat the entire leaf. We did use an insecticide to kill them. We always plant flowers that will provide a positive atmosphere for beneficial insects that will feed on these and other negative insects. Learn more from the University of Minnesota here.

Pick-Up and Delivery

  • Remember that pick-up and deliveries will be on the schedule you have arranged with Harner Brothers CSA – please note the exceptions to this which were in the email.Please follow the CDC and MDH guidelines and COVID-19 procedures in email.
  • It is your responsibility to know that the pick-up or drop-off time will occur at the agreed upon time, and it is your responsibility as a shareholder to know this and be responsible for the produce at that time. If you are unable to utilize your share that week, it is still your responsibility: find someone else to pick it up or donate it to the food shelf.
  • Each box is labeled for each family. The same boxes will be used for your family throughout the season. Boxes and containers should be returned the following week. Bags will only be used once.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

4-10-12 Making rhubarb tort (3)

When rhubarb is harvested it is pulled from the ground. The white ends are what was pulled out of the ground (cut these off), and the leaves are cut off of the other side. After washing your rhubarb. Cut off both ends and cut it into 1/4 inch – 1/2 inch pieces. Now you are ready to use it in a recipe or freeze it.

Rhubarb – One pound equals about 3 cups. Wash, cut the ends off, cut off any bad parts damaged by wind, chop into 1/4 – 1/2 inch pieces. No need to peel. You can freeze it in a Ziploc bag (no blanching) and use for months to come. Our family loves it in muffins, breads, jam, pie, crisp, sauce and torte. Check out these recipes at Taste of Home.

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Spinach can be harvested many times from the same crop. You cut the leaves off of the plant, and they grow back. So we get several harvests from one planting.

Spinach – Love this in a salad by itself or in sandwiches. Wash it and enjoy.

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I just love the braided look on the stem of the onion.

Onion – Enjoy a fresh onion in a dish this week. Eat it raw or use it in a dish.

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French Radish – I never get tired of the beautiful colors of this crop.

French Breakfast Radish – Love the variegated look of this vegetable. This crop is coming to an end.

Cherry Belle Radish – Add great flavor and color to a salad. My mom loves a radish sandwich…sliced radishes between two slices of buttered bread.

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The aroma of cilantro is amazing. Their leaves or so fun to look at as well.

Cilantro – Wash and enjoy. Freeze extra by placing in ice cube trays and running water over them and freeze. A good way to use later in soups and other dishes. Check out these ideas from Taste of Home on how to use this herb.

Hostas with Weigela or Spirea – These should brighten up your home.

Recipe of the Week

I love rhubarb and have many favorite recipes. This particular one takes more time so I just don’t make it as frequently. But it is worth the effort! Don’t let the meringue scare you. Give it a try.

Rhubarb Torte

Crust – 1st step

1 cup flour

½ cup butter

Dash salt

2 Tablespoons sugar

Mix like a pie crust until crumbly. Push down in your pan and bake for 25 minutes at 325 degrees Fahrenheit.

Middle – 2nd step

1 ½ cups sugar

2 Tablespoons flour

1/3 cup cream

3 egg yolks beaten

3-4 cups chopped rhubarb about ½ inch pieces

While crust is baking. Cook the middle mixture in the microwave, stirring frequently until mixture is thick. Pour over baked crust. Place this all in the oven at 325 degrees Fahrenheit for 15 minutes.

Top – 3rd step

3 egg whites – mix with hand mixer until the whites are stiff when you lift out the mixer

Add

¼ teaspoon cream of tarter

1/3 cup powdered sugar

A dash of vanilla

A dash of salt

Beat all of this together. Spread on top of the middle mixture. Place in oven for about 5 minutes at 325 degrees Fahrenheit. Tips for making meringue.

Enjoy! It is worth the effort.

Weeding Through It

Weeding Through It

With heat, humidity and rain this week, you can be assured of one thing…a lot of weeds, and time spent managing the weeds so they don’t overtake the crops. Some weeks, I loathe the time weeding, and sometimes I find solitude in the accomplished task and how much better the crop looks once completed. Some days, I find that it is a task done well as a family, and some days it is a task done well alone.

This week, was a combination of all of the above. Sometimes life can feel that way to. Before you know it, the path appears to be cluttered with weeds. Don’t let the weeds get in the way to your brighter outcomes. Find a way either alone or with others to reach and accomplish the task.

Garden Science – Potato Bugs

Potato bugs are a real menace and staying in front of insect management is essential for any crop. One photo is the adult and on the leaf you see the yellow eggs.

Pick-Up and Delivery

•Remember that pick-up and deliveries will be on the schedule you have arranged with Harner Brothers CSA – please note the exceptions to this which were in the email.Please follow the CDC and MDH guidelines and COVID-19 procedures in email.

•It is your responsibility to know that the pick-up or drop-off time will occur at the agreed upon time, and it is your responsibility as a shareholder to know this and be responsible for the produce at that time. If you are unable to utilize your share that week, it is still your responsibility: find someone else to pick it up or donate it to the food shelf.

• Each box is labeled for each family. The same boxes will be used for your family throughout the season. Boxes and containers should be returned the following week. Bags will only be used once.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

When rhubarb is harvested it is pulled from the ground. The white ends are what was pulled out of the ground (cut these off), and the leaves are cut off of the other side.

Rhubarb – One pound equals about 3 cups. Wash, cut the ends off, cut off any bad parts damaged by wind, chop into 1/4 – 1/2 inch pieces. No need to peel. You can freeze it in a Ziploc bag (no blanching) and use for months to come. Our family loves it in muffins, breads, jam, pie, crisp, sauce and torte. Check out these recipes at Taste of Home.

Asparagus – Fresh cut asparagus from Lorence’s Berry Farm near Northfield. Check out America’s Heartland’s information on asparagus.

Spinach – Love this in a salad by itself or in sandwiches. Wash it and enjoy.

French Breakfast Radish Love the variegated look of this vegetable.

Cherry Belle Radish – Add great flavor and color to a salad. My mom loves a radish sandwich…sliced radishes between two slices of buttered bread.

Cilantro – Wash and enjoy. Freeze extra by placing in ice cube trays and running water over them and freeze. A good way to use later in soups and other dishes. Check out these ideas from Taste of Home on how to use this herb.

Chives – Cut them up and use as you would onions. Add good flavor to a variety of dishes. Try the Pioneer Woman’s Cheddar Chive Biscuits.

Peonies are one of my favorite flowers.

Peonies and Hostas – These should brighten up your home.

Recipe of the Week

Enjoy with ice cream or whipped topping.

Rhubarb Torte

Using a pie crust cutter. Mix the following.
2 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
2 teaspoons salt
2 Tablespoons milk
1/2 cup butter

Mix then pat into a 9 x 13 cake pan.
6 cups rhubarb
6 oz package of strawberry or raspberry Jello.
Place cut rhubarb on top of the bottom layer. Rhubarb should be cut into 1/2 inch pieces. Sprinkle Jello powder over rhubarb.
 
Topping:
2 cups sugar
1 cup flour
1/2 cup butter
Mix with pie cutter or fork and spread on top of Jello.
Bake at 375 degrees Fahrenheit for 45 minutes.
Glimmer of Hope

Glimmer of Hope

In the upheaval of today’s world, some things are constant: weeds will show up even when you least expect them; unpredictable weather is out of our control; and unpredictable days are full of surprises. It is interesting to look at our world through things we see each day while #StillFarming. There are lessons that can be applied to every day life. We can focus a positive attitude on the surprises some will be good and some will be challenging; manage the weeds/challenges to the best of our ability and recognize that overall God is in control hand over our worries.

“We rejoice in our sufferings, knowing that suffering produces endurance, and endurance produces character, and character produces hope, and hope does not put us to shame, because God’s love has been poured into our hearts.” – Romans 5:3–5

It’s been a busy week trying to stay in front of weed growth, planting another round of crops and prepping for the first CSA. Distance learning has included a variety of hands on lessons in the field and with equipment.

Here is a glimpse into the past few weeks and a look at what is in your boxes.

The mulch has been installed for the tomatoes, and the tomatoes are planted.
We also were busy tilling this weekend both for weed control and another round of planting.
Dragging Between rows to keep the weeds under control.
Dragging between rows to keep the weeds under control.

Pick-Up and Delivery

•Remember that pick-up and deliveries will be on the schedule you have arranged with Harner Brothers CSA – please note the exceptions to this which were in the email.Please follow the CDC and MDH guidelines and COVID-19 procedures in email.
It is your responsibility to know that the pick-up or drop-off time will occur at the agreed upon time, and it is your responsibility as a shareholder to know this and be responsible for the produce at that time. If you are unable to utilize your share that week, it is still your responsibility: find someone else to pick it up or donate it to the food shelf.
• Each box is labeled for each family. The same boxes will be used for your family throughout the season. Boxes and containers should be returned the following week. Bags will only be used once.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

Rhubarb – One pound equals about 3 cups. Wash, cut the ends off, cut off any bad parts damaged by wind, chop into 1/4 – 1/2 inch pieces. No need to peel. You can freeze it in a Ziploc bag (no blanching) and use for months to come. Our family loves it in muffins, breads, jam, pie, crisp, sauce and torte.

Asparagus – Fresh cut asparagus from Lorence’s Berry Farm near Northfield.

Spinach – Love this mixed into a salad with other greens or as a stand alone by itself.

Radishes Cherry Belle and French Breakfast radishes. We are nearing the end of this crop for a little while.

Cilantro – wash and enjoy. Freeze extra by placing in ice cube trays and running water over them and freeze. A good way to use later in soups and other dishes. Check out these ideas from Taste of Home on how to use this herb.

Chives – Cut them up and use as you would onions. Add good flavor to a variety of dishes. Try the Pioneer Woman’s Cheddar Chive Biscuits.

Recipe of the Week

Strawberry Spinach Salad
Strawberry Spinach Salad

Strawberry Dressing
3 Tablespoons apple juice
2 Tablespoons strawberry spreadable fruit
2 Tablespoons balsamic vinegar

Salad
1 lb boneless skinless chicken breasts
8 cups bite-size pieces spinach
1 cup strawberries, stems removed and strawberries cut in half
1/4 cup crumbled Gorgonzola cheese (1 oz)
1/4 cup chopped walnuts

Directions
1. In small bowl, mix all dressing ingredients until blended; set aside.
2. Spray 10-inch skillet with cooking spray; heat over medium-high heat. Cook chicken in skillet 15 to 20 minutes, turning once, until juice of chicken is clear when center of thickest part is cut (170°F). Remove chicken to cutting board.
3. Add dressing to skillet; stir to loosen any pan drippings.
4. Cut chicken into slices. Among 4 plates, divide spinach. Top with chicken, strawberries and cheese. Drizzle with dressing. Sprinkle with walnuts.
Source: Taste of Home

Hope on the Horizon

Hope on the Horizon

There are so many COVID-19 challenges in everyone’s lives. I like to focus on the hope in our future. That is one of the reasons I love planting season. There so much hope in what is to come in what we put in the ground. So much hope in the warmer weather and the longer days of summer.

One of my favorite Bible verses has a message of Hope.

“For I know the plans I have for you declares the Lord, plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you Hope and a Future.” – Jeremiah 29:11

I know for many this verse holds much confusion in the current situations, and the future is difficult to grasp now. I encourage you to focus on what this season brings – Hope. Sending you all Peace and Hope.

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The potatoes were planted last Thursday. Thus far, we have Yukon Gold, Kennebec and Dark Red Norlands planted. I love seeing the names of the families who grew the seed potatoes that we are planting. For those of you noticing where they were grown…Sabin, MN is in Clay County.

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We installed the cucumber fence so that the cucumbers will grow on top of the fence and hang down through the fence for easier harvesting and vegetables that should be cleaner.

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The different varieties of onion sets planted were Ailssa Craig, Walla Walla, Patterson and Redwing onions.

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All that could safely be planted during this time of year was planted. We take into consideration that the threat of frost is still upon us. The boys were happy to till the fields before planting to provide for a nice seed bed.

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Again, the seed differences are fascinating. It is simply amazing what they grow in to. Such a variety were planted this past weekend. With the gentle rain and weather warming up, there is hope on the horizon with all of the challenges we face.

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A few home improvements have kept the learning going including siding the shop.

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There is a lot of uncertainty as to whether there will be fairs this summer. But, we decided as a family that we would still get 4-H pigs. Because there is more to a 4-H project than just an investment. It is the day to day learning of working on the project and caring for the animal. As I look at the boys with the pigs and all the uncertainty and challenges that are facing our pig farmers, to me it is also a representation of hope in our future. We also decided to make some changes to their pig pen this year. The last two years have been SO wet and such a mud hole for the pigs. We feel it will be much healthier to have them on a cement floor. The boys look forward to walking them in the yard after they have gotten used to their surroundings.

 

 

Warmer weather on the Horizon

Warmer weather on the Horizon

We are ready for some sunshine and no snow and are hopeful that the weather forecast of warmer days to come are upon us. Here is a glimpse of our activity last week.

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Keith and I planted some of our seeds last week such as cauliflower, tomatoes, watermelon and more.

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It is fun to see all of the different sizes and shapes of the seeds and then to see what they grow into. A miracle combined with science and Mother Nature – always fun to witness.

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We were grateful for a beautiful day. The boys all had a hard time believing me that we were in a winter storm warning for the following day.

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Sure enough, the snow came, and the boys made the most of it. Grateful that one week later the snow is gone.

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Keith with one of the Isa Brown hens that is quickly growing and maturing at little over 7 weeks old.

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After a hard days work, it was fun to see the boys sit down and just enjoy these young chickens. This is one of the male rooster Isa Browns at just over 7 weeks of age.