End of the Season

End of the Season

It is hard to believe it is the end of September. The amount of produce in this week’s box felt overwhelming and wonderful all at the same time. Look below for some ideas and ways to preserve your produce for the upcoming winter. We hope that your freezer and shelves are full of produce to use throughout the winter.As we were working on the final harvest, we were all pleasantly surprised be the amount of produce that decided to “show up” after the last few weeks of weather. It is amazing what rain does for all of us. This was definitely needed after our dry growing season.

Perhaps this is a good lesson to reflect on. Rain is a lot like love, care, kindness, patience and grace all wrapped together. When we shower others with this, they too grow into more than they ever thought was possible. As we all scramble to find the new balance in this year’s school year, this is worth reflecting on.

In closing, we wish you rain that fills your box up with enough abundance to share with others and plenty to nourish your well-being. Thank you for another great year!

Thank you for a great season!

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list.

Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

Arugula – Also known as “rocket” or “roquette,” arugula is a fast-growing, cool-season leafy green that adds a tangy, mustard-like flavor to salads.

Beets – Enjoy beets by peeling and cutting into wedges. Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast in the oven for 25 to 30 minutes at 400 degrees Fahrenheit or boil with the skin on for approximately 30 to 45 minutes or until tender. Eat with a dab of butter or in a salad. Check out the NDSU Pocket Guide to Preparing Fruits and Vegetables.

Brussel Sprouts – This was our first year growing brussel sprouts. It was fun to see who liked them.

CabbageThis looks like a yummy way to use up your cabbage.

Carrots are a wonderful root vegetable. Place in your refrigerator and eat raw or cooked.

Carrots – The carrot crop in general did not liked the drought this year. We were so happy for the end harvest! Enjoy fresh or cooked. Try these brown sugar glazed carrots from Martha Stewart. Cut off the tops, rinse and air-dry them for storage in an air-tight plastic bag in the refrigerator to maintain proper humidity. Carrots will maintain their freshness longer at or around 32 degrees F.

Cauliflower – Here are a few ideas of how to use this vegetable from Taste of Home.

Cucumbers – Here are a few cucumber ideas from Martha Stewart.

Peppers – Learn more about peppers from America’s Heartland. I like to cut my peppers up and freeze them to pull out to use later.

Potatoes – Red Norland, Yukon Gold and Kennebec potatoes. Great for baking, cooking on the grill, boiling or mashed. Learn more about how potatoes are harvested from America’s Heartland.

Pumpkins and Gourds – Enjoy some Fall decorations. Check out this information on gourds.

Onions – White Onions – cut and freeze for easy use in your recipes.

Salsa – Are you trying to figure out how to store and use your tomatoes. Check out this resource from NDSU.

Summer Squash – The last of the zucchini and summer squash. I’m making mine into bread and brownies. Shred this and freeze in two cup quantities for quick use in your recipes.

Tomatoes – A few Fourth of July, yellow, cherry Sungold tomatoes. I love the size of the Fourth of July for a quick lunch, and the Sungolds. Let us know if you are interested in canning or freezing extra quantities. We do still have plenty. Let us know if you are interested in more.

Watermelon – Check out these options and consider freezing your watermelon so you don’t loose out on the goodness.

Winter Squash Butternut, Kuri, Spaghetti and Carnival squash this week. Sorry to inundate you all at once. Remember that Butternut, Kuri and Carnival squash can be cooked and then frozen for use throughout the winter.

Yes, we harvested by the light of the full moon. What beautiful fall evenings we have been blessed with!

Recipe of the Week

Borscht (Beet and Vegetable Soup)

2-3 large beets, peeled and diced
1 large onion, diced
4 garlic cloves, minced
2 carrots, diced
6 c. water or vegetable broth
2 large potatoes, diced
2 large tomatoes, diced
½ medium cabbage, cut into strips 
1 bay leaf 
¼ c. lemon juice
Salt and pepper (to taste)
1 tsp. dill
½ c. fresh parsley or cilantro, chopped
Sour cream or Greek yogurt (optional)  

Add vegetable oil to a large heavy-bottomed pot and heat on medium. Add onions and sauté until soft, then add garlic and sauté briefly. Add broth and/or water and heat until simmering. Add carrots, beets, potatoes, cabbage and tomatoes and bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and add bay leaf, salt, pepper and lemon juice. Simmer until all vegetables are tender (20 to 30 minutes). 

Add chopped herbs and adjust seasonings if needed. Top with a dollop of sour cream or yogurt if desired. 

Makes eight servings. Each serving has 130 calories, 0 g fat, 4 g protein, 30 g carbohydrate, 5 g fiber and 160 mg sodium.

Source: Julie Garden-Robinson, Ph.D., R.D., L.R.D., is a North Dakota State University Extension food and nutrition specialist and professor in the Department of Health, Nutrition and Exercise Sciences.

4-H Journey to the State Fair

4-H Journey to the State Fair

The Minnesota State Fair means something different for everyone. Perhaps it brings back a memory of cheese curds, giant yellow slide, seed art, Miracle of Birth Center or great family memories.

For our family, it means a journey of continual learning in 4-H project areas that culminate with the opportunity to compete and learn from 4-Hers from across our state’s 87 counties. When I was a 4-Her, we were allowed to accept and take one state fair trip. I took my pig. Because going to the fair with an animal was simply way more fun than a general project area. This year, Keith was old enough and earned state fair trips by receiving high county fair placings in both a livestock and a general project area. He also judged with the county’s general livestock judging team.

Swine Project

The livestock project journey begins with selecting 4-H pigs earlier in the year. The boys select their pigs on their own based upon what they feel will match what the judge is looking for. During the summer months, they work with them so they walk the way you want them to in the show ring, feed them a balanced nutritional ration to grow the way you would like them to and care for the pig(s) so they reach their full potential.

Livestock projects allow our kids to learn through hands-on experiences. The livestock teach life lessons that are sometimes simply difficult to put into words. The animals become a steady companion throughout the growing cycle, that listen to them, teach patience and perseverance, compassion and loss, winning and losing, contentment and friendship, dedication and follow-through. There were many mornings before and after baseball tournaments that I found the boys working with their animals.

This all culminates at the state fair. 4-Hers participate in a species-specific interview, showmanship and the animal being judged.

Vegetable Gardening

The vegetable gardening project area begins with selecting varieties to plant to preparing harvests to occur at both the county fair in July and the state fair in August. This planning begins the season before and continues through the planting season.

Preparing the project items for the vegetable garden project to be taken to the fair takes a considerable amount of time. Consider harvesting all of the following: two small vegetables: 12 pea pods and 12 green beans (12 cherry tomatoes for the state fair); three medium sized vegetables: three carrots, three beets, three cucumbers and one large vegetable. If there is more than one, they need to be as close to identical as possible. Once harvested, the tops and bottoms need to be trimmed, and vegetables cleaned appropriately to display vibrantly. It is time consuming. For the project judging they need to know planting conditions, vegetable variety selection, challenges with the growing season and how to resolve them, pest control and health benefits of the vegetables and how to utilize the vegetables.

This is just a snippet of the two project areas that Keith took to the state fair. As parents and volunteer 4-H leaders, we learn so much by being on this journey with them and are so grateful for all the mentors that support their learning and personal growth. We are blessed beyond measure with the friendships and opportunities that 4-H provides to our family.

We encourage you to contact your county Extension office or search online for your 4-H in your area. It’s easy to say you don’t have time to squeeze in one more activity for your kids. Once you see them experience a project interview with an adult judge at the fair or the learning that occurs through the project area, you will understand that 4-H is worth your time and effort. Learn more here.

Garden Science

You may wonder about the story behind your personalized pumpkins. This project starts in August with Steve and the boys carefully etching your names into a pumpkin. The scar on the skin heals over forming the beautiful art.

Pick-Up and Delivery

Remember that pick-up and deliveries will be on the schedule you have arranged with Harner Brothers CSA – please note the exceptions to this which were in the email. Please follow the CDC and MDH guidelines and COVID-19 procedures.

It is your responsibility to know that the pick-up or drop-off time will occur at the agreed upon time, and it is your responsibility as a shareholder to know this and be responsible for the produce at that time. If you are unable to utilize your share that week, it is still your responsibility: find someone else to pick it up or donate it to the food shelf.

Each box is labeled for each family. The same boxes will be used for your family throughout the season. Boxes and containers should be returned the following week. Bags will only be used once.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list.

Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

Beets – This beet crop has been fairly resilient through this crazy growing conditions. Enjoy beets by peeling and cutting into wedges. Drizzle with olive oil and season with salt and pepper. Roast in the oven for 25 to 30 minutes at 400 degrees Fahrenheit or boil with the skin on for approximately 30 to 45 minutes or until tender. Eat with a dab of butter or in a salad. Check out the NDSU Pocket Guide to Preparing Fruits and Vegetables.

Carrots – The carrot crop in general has not liked the drought this year. Enjoy fresh or cooked. Try these brown sugar glazed carrots from Martha Stewart.

Cucumbers – The cucumbers have picked up and the second planting is doing well. If you are interested in pickling some we may have extra for you to do so. Here are a few cucumber ideas from Martha Stewart.

Peppers – A variety of peppers for you to chose from. Learn more about peppers from America’s Heartland.

Potatoes – Red Norland potatoes. Great for cooking on the grill, boiling or mashed. Learn more about how potatoes are harvested from America’s Heartland.

Onions – White Onions

Winter Squash Butternut, Kuri, Spaghetti and Carnival squash this week. Sorry to inundate you all at once. Remember that Butternut, Kuri and Carnival squash can be cooked and then frozen for use throughout the winter

Salsa

Tomatoes – A few Fourth of July, yellow, cherry Sungold tomatoes. I love the size of the Fourth of July for a quick lunch, and the Sungolds. Let us know if you are interested in canning or freezing extra quantities. Enjoy the salsa this week! Let us know if you are interested in more.

Sam selected the area that he felt would grow the best watermelon. I think he did a good job! We hope you enjoy this delight.

Watermelon – Sam took on the role of growing the watermelons this year. We are so excited with the outcomes. Enjoy!

Pumpkins, Ornamental Corn and Corn Shocks – Enjoy some Fall decorations. More to come next week.

Recipe of the Week

Butternut Squash

My family loves this recipe, and the boys eat it like crazy. I also use the prepared squash in place of pumpkin in many recipes. Butternut

Cut squash in 1/2 add enough water to cover pan (about 1/2 inch up on the side of the pan).

Bake at 375 degrees for about 1 hour.

Take out of oven. Scoop out seeds. The seeds can be kept and roasted.*Using a large knife cut off skin and place in another bowl.

Presents under the leaves

Presents under the leaves

It is hard to believe that the end of the growing season is just around the corner. But it is true, it is almost the middle of September, school has begun, and the smell of fall is in the air. I do love fall. There is just always part of me that is sad to see summer come to a close.

It is so exciting to se what is growing under the leaves.

On the bright side, the pumpkins are peeking through the leaves and the color in the garden is exciting to see. It sometimes feels like Christmas and the excitement of seeing presents under the tree. Only it is presents under the leaves scattered across the field.

The recent rains have given everything a little boost to finish the growing season strong. We are anxious to harvest sweet potatoes, watermelon, winter squashes, gourds, pumpkins, popcorn and ornamental corn. Be prepared for a variety of choices and colors. Don’t let the abundance overwhelm you. Focus instead on the joyful calm that the beautiful array of colors bring.

We have been patiently waiting for the right time to harvest the watermelon. Patience is a virtue.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list.

Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

Lettuce/Spinach/Kale Mix – Unfortunately, this crop has really struggled this year. This week was a mix of spinach, kale and Red Oak Leaf lettuce.

Beets – Detroit Dark Red Beets

Fancipak Cucumbers

Cabbage or Cauliflower – Purple cabbage or purple cauliflower varieties to try this week.

Cucumbers – The cucumbers have picked up and the second planting is doing well. If you are interested in pickling some we may have extra for you to do so.

Kohlrabi – A garden favorite. I love to peel it, cut it up like an apple and dip in peanut butter.

Peppers – A variety are available. Let us know what you think about the hot peppers. Meanwhile, you have green peppers and the smaller red peppers, Sweet, Cherry Stuffer.

Potatoes – Red Norland potatoes. Great for cooking on the grill, boiling or mashed.

We love the braided stem of the onion.

Onions – White Onions

Radishes – The last of this year’s radishes. Enjoy them in a salad, on a sandwich or in a hot dish.

Summer Squash – Zucchini, Peter Pan and Sunburst varieties. These younger varieties are greatTIP: use your summer squash like your zucchini. None of these need to be peeled when using them.

Sungold Tomatoes

Tomatoes – A few Fourth of July, yellow, cherry Sungold tomatoes. I love the size of the Fourth of July for a quick lunch, and the Sungolds. The tomatoes are quickly turning. Let us know if you are interested in canning or freezing extra quantities. Let us know if you are interested in more tomato juice.

Winter Squash – Butternut, Kuri and Spaghetti squash are available this week.

Zinnias and Hydrangeas – These should brighten up your home. Put a splash of bleach in the water to help them last longer.

Recipe of the Week

Grilled Corn and Tomato Salad

Serve as a dip with your favorite chips or crackers. The zesty lime dressing offers a fun punch of summer that will have you making this salad again and again.

4 ears sweet corn
1 garlic clove, minced
1 jalapeño seeds and ribs removed, minced
Zest and juice of 1 lime
¼ c. canola oil
2 ripe avocados halved, pitted, peeled and diced
1 c. cherry tomatoes, quartered
6 scallions thinly sliced
½ c finely chopped fresh cilantro leaves
Salt and pepper to taste

-Preheat the grill to medium heat.

-Grill corn until tender about 20 minutes. Let cool and remove kernels.

-In a large bowl, combine the garlic, jalapeño, lime zest, lime juice, and oil. Whisk to combine.

-Add the corn, avocado, tomatoes, scallions, and cilantro and toss gently to combine. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

Source: NDSU Extension

Under the Canopy

Under the Canopy

It is so much fun at this time of year to walk around and find what is growing under the canopy of leaves. We are seeing a variety of winter squashes, pumpkins, gourds, cantaloupes and watermelon. The challenging part of all of this is that while we are super excited to see them, we still have to be patient for them to reach full maturity.

It is a good reminder that being patient in life is worth the wait.

Be prepared that a lot of surprises will be harvested in the coming weeks. We encourage you to be ready to preserve the produce to enjoy this winter.

Pick-Up and Delivery

Remember that pick-up and deliveries will be on the schedule you have arranged with Harner Brothers CSA – please note the exceptions to this which were in the email. Please follow the CDC and MDH guidelines and COVID-19 procedures.

It is your responsibility to know that the pick-up or drop-off time will occur at the agreed upon time, and it is your responsibility as a shareholder to know this and be responsible for the produce at that time. If you are unable to utilize your share that week, it is still your responsibility: find someone else to pick it up or donate it to the food shelf.

Each box is labeled for each family. The same boxes will be used for your family throughout the season. Boxes and containers should be returned the following week. Bags will only be used once.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

Boxes of Produce

Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

Lettuce/Spinach Mix – Unfortunately, this crop has really struggled this year. This week was a mix of spinach, kale, Black Seeded Simpson and Red Oak Leaf lettuce.

Brussel Sprouts – Give this vegetable a try. I had never tried them until this year, and I was pleasantly surprised.

Cucumbers – The cucumbers have picked up and the second planting is doing well. If you are interested in pickling some we may have extra for you to do so.

Green Beans – The first of this second crop. Perhaps you are interested in pickling some. Let us know. It looks like there is a good crop coming.

Purple Kohlrabi – love the color.

Kohlrabi – A garden favorite. I love to peel it, cut it up like an apple and dip in peanut butter.

Peppers – A variety are making an appearance in the garden. There will be some super-hot ones forth coming. Meanwhile, I encourage you to try the smaller red peppers, Sweet, Cherry Stuffer.

Potatoes – Kennebec potatoes. Great for the grill or baked.

Onions – A variety of onions were harvested this week, Walla Walla and Blush Onions.

Summer Squash – Zucchini, Peter Pan and Sunburst varieties. TIP: use your summer squash like your zucchini. None of these need to be peeled when using them.

Super Sugar Snap Peas – We started the second planting of this crop. We are grateful that the peas are doing well with the timely rains.

Sungold Tomatoes – super sweet surprise. Great to eat even for breakfast!

Tomatoes – A few Fourth of July and cherry Sungold tomatoes. I love the size of the Fourth of July for a quick lunch, and the Sungolds. The tomatoes are quickly turning. Let us know if you are interested in canning or freezing extra quantities.

Sunflowers, Zinnias and Hydrangeas – These should brighten up your home. Put a splash of bleach in the water to help them last longer.

Recipe of the Week

Banana-Zucchini Bread

Banana-Zucchini Bread

3 cups all-purpose flour

1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder

1-1/2 teaspoons baking soda

1-1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

1 teaspoon salt

4 large eggs, room temperature

2 medium ripe bananas, mashed (about 1 cup)

2 cups sugar

1 cup applesauce

1-1/2 cups shredded unpeeled zucchini

1 cup chopped pecans

Directions

Preheat oven to 350°. In a large bowl, whisk flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon and salt. In another bowl, whisk eggs, bananas, sugar and oil. Add to flour mixture; stir just until moistened. Fold in zucchini and pecans.

Pour into 2 greased 9×5-in. loaf pans. Bake until a toothpick inserted in center comes out clean, 45-50 minutes. Cool in pans for 10 minutes before removing to wire racks to cool completely.

Source: Taste of Home

Hidden Color Unveiled

Hidden Color Unveiled

One of the interesting and unique aspects about harvesting tomatoes and working with the tomatoes is that when we wash our hands, they are so green, and boy do you smell like a tomato! This is unlike any other crop that we grow and harvest.

I always wonder about the hidden message in these lessons found in the garden. Perhaps this lesson is that sometimes what makes us so unique is hidden amongst many things. Until you “dive in” and go to work, you don’t really see the benefit of what’s in front of you or you reap what you work hard for?

For example, we have oodles of tomatoes. You need to go through the vines to find the ripe one. This takes time, patience and tenacity. This is not always fun when it is hot out. While the green color and smell are unique and different when we wash our hands, these are reminders of the hard work and perhaps God is telling us to pause and remember the lessons and treasures that were unveiled from our determination.

I encourage you to take time this week to see what lessons God is trying to teach you. I know it is hard to pause and reflect. It is in this reflection that many “ah ha” moments and lessons can be learned

Pick-Up and Delivery

Remember that pick-up and deliveries will be on the schedule you have arranged with Harner Brothers CSA – please note the exceptions to this which were in the email. Please follow the CDC and MDH guidelines and COVID-19 procedures.

It is your responsibility to know that the pick-up or drop-off time will occur at the agreed upon time, and it is your responsibility as a shareholder to know this and be responsible for the produce at that time. If you are unable to utilize your share that week, it is still your responsibility: find someone else to pick it up or donate it to the food shelf.

Each box is labeled for each family. The same boxes will be used for your family throughout the season. Boxes and containers should be returned the following week. Bags will only be used once.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

A variety of lettuce, kale and spinach greens for you this week.

Lettuce/Spinach Mix – Unfortunately, this crop has really struggled this year. This week was a mix of spinach, kale, Black Seeded Simpson and Red Oak Leaf lettuce.

Cucumbers – The cucumbers have picked up and the second planting is doing well. If you are interested in pickling some we may have extra for you to do so.

Harvesting green beans is always better with a partner.

Green Beans – The first of this second crop. Perhaps you are interested in pickling some. Let us know. It looks like there is a good crop coming.

Kohlrabi – A garden favorite. I love to peel it, cut it up like an apple and dip in peanut butter.

Pepper, Sweet, Cherry Stuffer Hybrid

Peppers – A variety are making an appearance in the garden. There will be some super-hot ones forth coming. Meanwhile, I encourage you to try the smaller red peppers, Sweet, Cherry Stuffer.

Potatoes – Kennebec potatoes. Great for the grill or baked.

Onions – A variety of onions were harvested this week, Walla Walla and Blush Onions.

Sweet Corn – Thank you to our neighbors the Peterson family for supplying our sweet corn for your families.

Summer Squash – Zucchini, Peter Pan and Sunburst varieties. TIP: use your summer squash like your zucchini. None of these need to be peeled when using them.

Super Sugar Snap Peas – We started the second planting of this crop. We are grateful that the peas are doing well with the timely rains.

Tomatoes – A few Fourth of July and cherry Sungold tomatoes. I love the size of the Fourth of July for a quick lunch, and the Sungolds. The tomatoes are quickly turning. Let us know if you are interested in canning or freezing extra quantities.

Sunflowers, Zinnias and Hydrangeas – These should brighten up your home. Put a splash of bleach in the water to help them last longer.

Recipe of the Week

One of the interesting and unique aspects about harvesting tomatoes and working with the tomatoes is that when we wash our hands, they are so green, and boy do you smell like a tomato! This is unlike any other crop that we grow and harvest.
Banana-Zucchini Bread

Banana-Zucchini Bread

3 cups all-purpose flour

1-1/2 teaspoons baking powder

1-1/2 teaspoons baking soda

1-1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

1 teaspoon salt

4 large eggs, room temperature

2 medium ripe bananas, mashed (about 1 cup)

2 cups sugar

1 cup applesauce

1-1/2 cups shredded unpeeled zucchini

1 cup chopped pecans

Directions

Preheat oven to 350°. In a large bowl, whisk flour, baking powder, baking soda, cinnamon and salt. In another bowl, whisk eggs, bananas, sugar and oil. Add to flour mixture; stir just until moistened. Fold in zucchini and pecans.

Pour into 2 greased 9×5-in. loaf pans. Bake until a toothpick inserted in center comes out clean, 45-50 minutes. Cool in pans for 10 minutes before removing to wire racks to cool completely.

Source: Taste of Home

Connections

Connections

Life is a crazy balance. Today with no sports conflicts, we were able to pause the craziness and connect with many of you.

We also find that the CSA helps us, as a family, to create opportunities for conversations while we are planting, weeding and harvesting. I often remind us; how valuable time is and that time is passing us by quickly.

We need to remind ourselves to listen, be in the moment and fully engage with each other. Doing so, not only helps us to be physically and mentally present to connect with each other, it also helps us to be more aware of the nature around us which we know has a connection to minimizing stress.

Connecting with others with good conversations is time well spent. It fills up our buckets, and we hope that it does the same for all of you.

I found this quote to be so true. Good connecting conversations are not only fun, they are also stimulating for the mind.

“Good conversation is as stimulating as black coffee, and just as hard to sleep after.” – Anne Morrow Lindbergh

Garden Science

The dry weather is still impacting garden outcomes. We appreciate your patience as some crops struggle to geminate let alone produce. According to the University of Minnesota – Waseca Experiment Station, we have received just enough rainfall to keep the crops progressing. Not nearly enough rain for our very dry soils.

In addition, we have a few other animal science related items occurring.

Pick-Up and Delivery

Remember that pick-up and deliveries will be on the schedule you have arranged with Harner Brothers CSA – please note the exceptions to this which were in the email. Please follow the CDC and MDH guidelines and COVID-19 procedures.

It is your responsibility to know that the pick-up or drop-off time will occur at the agreed upon time, and it is your responsibility as a shareholder to know this and be responsible for the produce at that time. If you are unable to utilize your share that week, it is still your responsibility: find someone else to pick it up or donate it to the food shelf.

Each box is labeled for each family. The same boxes will be used for your family throughout the season. Boxes and containers should be returned the following week. Bags will only be used once.

Boxes of Produce

Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

Lettuce/Spinach Mix – Unfortunately, this crop has really struggled this year. This week was a mix of spinach, kale, black seeded simpson and red oak leaf lettuce.

Cucumbers – The cucumbers have picked up and the second planting is doing well.

The braided stem of an onion is such a fascinating

Onions – We tried this new variety of Blush Onions. Not to hardy with the dry weather this year. Let us know what you think of it.

French Breakfast Radish/Cherry Belle Radish – This is the last of the radishes.

Super Sugar Snap Peas – We started the second planting of this crop. We are grateful that the peas are doing well with the timely rains.

Kohlrabi – A garden favorite. I love to peel it, cut it up like an apple and dip in peanut butter.

Tomatoes – A few Fourth of July and cherry Sungold tomatoes. I love the size of the Fourth of July for a quick lunch, and the Sungolds…well I never would have thought that I would love eating a tomato at 6 a.m.! There are a lot of green tomatoes on the vines. Hopeful for a good next few weeks.

This week’s variety of peppers.

Peppers – A variety are making an appearance in the garden. There will be some super-hot ones forth coming. Meanwhile, I encourage you to try the smaller red peppers, Sweet, Cherry Stuffer.

Beets – Detroit Dark Red Beets – eat them raw or roast them. Learn more here.

Potatoes – Red Nordlan potatoes. Great for the grill, mashed or potato salad.

Summer Squash – Zucchini, Peter Pan and Sunburst varieties. TIP: use your summer squash like your zucchini. None of these need to be peeled when using them.

Sunflowers, Zinnias and Hydrangeas – These should brighten up your home. Put a splash of bleach in the water to help them last longer.

Recipe of the Week

We are blessed with to many eggs and zucchini … so here is my solution!

Zucchini-Parmesan Bake

3 large eggs

1/2 cup canola oil

3 cups shredded zucchini (about 1 pound)

1 cup reduced-fat biscuit/baking mix

1/2 cup shredded Parmesan cheese

Directions

1. Preheat oven to 375°. In a large bowl, whisk eggs and oil until blended. Stir in remaining ingredients.

2. Transfer to a greased 10-in. ovenproof skillet. Bake 25-30 minutes or until golden brown.

Source: Taste of Home

Learn More about Land Grant Universities

Learn More about Land Grant Universities

This week, I had the opportunity to attend four different NDSU Extension Research Center Field Days in Hettinger, Dickinson and Williston, North Dakota and tour the agriculture experiment stations on the NDSU campus. NDSU is one of our nation’s Land Grant University’s. Their work on agriculture and our food system is very interesting. They are doing work to make a positive difference not only for the people of North Dakota but also for the world.

While attending this week’s tours, it was amazing to hear about:

-The different soil types in the region, and how long no-till has been a common practice by farmers in this region for many decades to conserve the soil.

-North Dakota is third in the nation in the variety of crops grown behind California and Florida.

-The excitement demonstrated by each researcher in the work that they do because of the desire they have to make a positive impact on the world around them.

I encourage you to learn more about the work being done by the land grant universities around us, and to have the same enthusiasm and passion to serve as I saw in these researchers that I met this week.

Garden Science

Cucumber beetles become active in late May or early June and feed on the blossoms of early flowering plants, such as dandelions, apples and hawthorn, until their host crops are available. Learn more from the University of Minnesota Extension.

Cucumber beetles – Learn more from the University of Minnesota Extension which is also a land grant university.

Pick-Up and Delivery

Remember that pick-up and deliveries will be on the schedule you have arranged with Harner Brothers CSA – please note the exceptions to this which were in the email. Please follow the CDC and MDH guidelines and COVID-19 procedures.

It is your responsibility to know that the pick-up or drop-off time will occur at the agreed upon time, and it is your responsibility as a shareholder to know this and be responsible for the produce at that time. If you are unable to utilize your share that week, it is still your responsibility: find someone else to pick it up or donate it to the food shelf.

Each box is labeled for each family. The same boxes will be used for your family throughout the season. Boxes and containers should be returned the following week. Bags will only be used once.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

The last week of rhubarb. Enjoy!

Rhubarb – One-pound equals about 3 cups. Wash, cut the ends off, cut off any bad parts damaged by wind, chop into 1/4 – 1/2-inch pieces. No need to peel. You can freeze it in a Ziploc bag (no blanching) and use for months to come. Our family loves it in muffins, breads, jam, pie, crisp, sauce and torte. Check out these recipes at Martha Stewart.

The Harner Bros are the 5th generation to raise this rhubarb originally planted on the family farm near Tracy by their great-great grandparents after immigrating from Norway and transplanted to our home near Northfield.

For those of you that love cucumbers, see how the young cucumber emerges from the flower..

Cucumbers – The cucumbers are just starting to come in.

Turnips – Learn more about this root vegetable and how to use the leafy greens from the University of Minnesota.

Onions – Fresh Walla Walla Onions

French Breakfast Radish/Cherry Belle Radish – We are at the end of the radish crops for a little while.

Super Sugar Snap Peas – We were glad to see pea pods on the vines this week. It seems this growing season has a lot of hope with it.

Notice all the white flowers on the green bean plan. A green bean will grow from those flowers.

Green Beans – I am sure glad we are seeing some green beans on these plants. Enjoy fresh or cooked.

Hostas with variety of greens and flowers – These should brighten up your home.

Recipe of the Week

Rhubarb Slush

3 cups chopped fresh or frozen rhubarb

1 cup water

1/3 cup sugar

1 cup apple juice

3/4 cup thawed pink lemonade concentrate

1 bottle (2 liters) 7-Up or Sprite

Directions

1. In a saucepan, combine rhubarb, water and sugar. Bring to a boil. Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 5 minutes or until rhubarb is tender. Cool for about 30 minutes.

2. In a food processor or blender, puree mixture, half at a time. Stir in apple juice and lemonade concentrate. Pour into a freezer container; cover and freeze until firm. Let stand at room temperature for 45 minutes before serving.

3. For individual servings, scoop 1/3 cup into a glass and fill with soda. To serve a group, place all of mixture in a large pitcher or punch bowl; add pop and stir. Serve immediately.

Source: Taste of Home

Belief

Belief

God Bless America!

Each growing season presents unique challenges. Whether they are challenges from Mother Nature or simply schedule and life challenges. Each year is unique. Yet, we continue our strong belief in what we do and why we do it.

This year part of our balancing act is managing additional time pressures since I am in the University of Minnesota Integrated Food Systems Leadership Program. These courses serve as a valuable reminder to never underestimate the value of sharing your story. There are so many different steps in our food supply chain to get our food from farm to fork as well as steps to ensure the foods’ safety. The class has also been a good reminder to remember what our experiences and personalities bring to the table, and how to bring out the best outcomes in a situation.

One area that shed some light for me is the Clifton Strengths Finders analysis when we discussed the area of “Belief.” It helped me understand my passionate core value around agriculture.

So, in my effort to help explain this belief, I felt sharing the FFA Creed in tonight’s blog may be a step to helping others grow in the understanding of how many of us in agriculture feel about the work we do.

The FFA Creed

I believe in the future of agriculture, with a faith born not of words but of deeds – achievements won by the present and past generations of agriculturists; in the promise of better days through better ways, even as the better things we now enjoy have come to us from the struggles of former years.

I believe that to live and work on a good farm, or to be engaged in other agricultural pursuits, is pleasant as well as challenging; for I know the joys and discomforts of agricultural life and hold an inborn fondness for those associations which, even in hours of discouragement, I cannot deny.

I believe in leadership from ourselves and respect from others. I believe in my own ability to work efficiently and think clearly, with such knowledge and skill as I can secure, and in the ability of progressive agriculturists to serve our own and the public interest in producing and marketing the product of our toil.

I believe in less dependence on begging and more power in bargaining; in the life abundant and enough honest wealth to help make it so–for others as well as myself; in less need for charity and more of it when needed; in being happy myself and playing square with those whose happiness depends upon me.

I believe that American agriculture can and will hold true to the best traditions of our national life and that I can exert an influence in my home and community which will stand solid for my part in that inspiring task.

The creed was written by E.M. Tiffany and adopted at the Third National FFA Convention. It was revised at the 38th and 63rd Conventions.

Pick-Up and Delivery

Remember that pick-up and deliveries will be on the schedule you have arranged with Harner Brothers CSA – please note the exceptions to this which were in the email. Please follow the CDC and MDH guidelines and COVID-19 procedures in email.

It is your responsibility to know that the pick-up or drop-off time will occur at the agreed upon time, and it is your responsibility as a shareholder to know this and be responsible for the produce at that time. If you are unable to utilize your share that week, it is still your responsibility: find someone else to pick it up or donate it to the food shelf.

Each box is labeled for each family. The same boxes will be used for your family throughout the season. Boxes and containers should be returned the following week. Bags will only be used once.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

Outrageous Red Lettuce, Black Seeded Simpson, Spinach and Kale – This year’s weather presents many unique challenges, down to what will germinate in this environment setting and what won’t…this is one of the challenges with these and other crops this year. This crop was cooled with well water to take the field heat off. It was not washed.

Turnips – Learn more about this root vegetable and how to use the leafy greens from the University of Minnesota.

French Breakfast Radish/Cherry Belle Radish – We are at the end of the radish crops for a little while.

Sugar snap peas were first developed in 1952 by cross-breeding snow pea with a mutant shell pea plant. Researchers hoped that the cross might counteract twisting and buckling seen in varieties at the time. With this cross, they developed a new class of snow pea. Snap peas, like all other peas, are pod fruits. An edible-podded pea is less fibrous, and edible when young. Pods of the edible-podded pea, including snap peas, do not have a membrane and do not open when ripe.

Super Sugar Snap Peas – We were glad to see pea pods on the vines this week. It seems this growing season has a lot of hope with it.

Jade Green Beans

Green Beans – I am sure glad we are seeing some green beans on these plants. Enjoy fresh or cooked.

Hostas with variety of greens and flowers – These should brighten up your home.

Recipe of the Week

Do you still have rhubarb in your refrigerator or did you cut it up and freeze it? If so, give this recipe a try. This is a go to of mine for a quick dessert. Next week will be the last of the rhubarb for the season.

Enjoy with ice cream or whipped topping.

Rhubarb Torte

Using a pie crust cutter. Mix the following:

  • 2 cups flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 2 Tablespoons milk
  • 1/2 cup butter
  • Mix then pat into a 9 x 13 cake pan. 
  • 6 cups rhubarb
  • 6 oz package of strawberry or raspberry Jello.

Place cut rhubarb on top of the bottom layer. Rhubarb should be cut into 1/2 inch pieces. Sprinkle Jello powder over rhubarb.

Topping:

  • 2 cups sugar
  • 1 cup flour
  • 1/2 cup butter

Mix with pie cutter or fork and spread on top of Jello. Bake at 375 degrees Fahrenheit for 45 minutes.

Continual Learning

Continual Learning

Life is full of new surprises and trying new things. This week, the boys were station leaders as our county and a neighboring county hosted an 4-H Agricultural Adventures day camp. While the boys have lead agriculture in the classroom activities in a variety of settings, this was a new experience. They taught kids how to plant seeds, plant identification, what parts of the plant we eat and about poultry, laying hens and turkeys.

So often, we are so closely tied to what we do that we take our knowledge for granted. We don’t realize the positive impact that we can have with others if we simply share our knowledge. Shortly after the camp, one of the boys’ friend was at our place and was asking about what the different plants were in the garden. The curiosity to know where and how your food is grown is natural, and we are privileged to share what we know with others.

On the flip side, we are also continually learning. Steve grew turnips when he was growing up. I on the other hand, never experienced them. Shareholders requested turnips so we grew them. Great news, they grow well in dry conditions! The other great news…I love hearing from all of you how you plan to use them.

“Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.” – Mahatama Gandhi

If you haven’t seen the kittens when you are out. Come early to snuggle with a few of these farm kittens. Interesting fact: when these kittens were meowing, Keith had them hug, and they stopped. The power of a hug!

Pick-Up and Delivery

Remember that pick-up and deliveries will be on the schedule you have arranged with Harner Brothers CSA – please note the exceptions to this which were in the email. Please follow the CDC and MDH guidelines and COVID-19 procedures in email.

It is your responsibility to know that the pick-up or drop-off time will occur at the agreed upon time, and it is your responsibility as a shareholder to know this and be responsible for the produce at that time. If you are unable to utilize your share that week, it is still your responsibility: find someone else to pick it up or donate it to the food shelf.

Each box is labeled for each family. The same boxes will be used for your family throughout the season. Boxes and containers should be returned the following week. Bags will only be used once.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

The Harner Bros are the 5th generation to raise this rhubarb originally planted on the family farm near Tracy by their great-great grandparents after immigrating from Norway and transplanted to our home near Northfield.

The Harner Bros are the 5th generation to raise this rhubarb originally planted on the family farm near Tracy by their great-great grandparents after immigrating from Norway and transplanted to our home near Northfield.

Rhubarb – One-pound equals about 3 cups. Wash, cut the ends off, cut off any bad parts damaged by wind, chop into 1/4 – 1/2-inch pieces. No need to peel. You can freeze it in a Ziploc bag (no blanching) and use for months to come. Our family loves it in muffins, breads, jam, pie, crisp, sauce and torte. Check out these recipes at Martha Stewart.

Spinach and Beet Leaves– Love this in a salad by itself or in sandwiches. Wash it and enjoy. Try this salad.

Outrageous Red Lettuce and Black Seeded Simpson – So grateful this crop seems to thrive on dry weather. Lovely color for sandwiches and salads. This crop was cooled with well water to take the field heat off. It was not washed.

Detroit Dark Red Beets

Beets – Detroit Dark Red Beets – eat them raw in a salad or boil them. Learn more here from Spend with Pennies.

Carrots

Carrots – Believe it or not, I was enjoying a carrot for breakfast at about 6 a.m. Who knew they would ever be delicious at that time. Learn more about carrot harvest from America’s Heartland.

Turnips

Turnips – Learn how to use this root vegetable and its leaves here from Country Living.

French Breakfast Radish – Love the variegated look of this vegetable. The dry weather is making this crop unpredictable. Check out these recipes from Martha Stewart.

Cherry Belle Radish – Add great flavor and color to a salad. My mom loves a radish sandwich…sliced radishes between two slices of buttered bread.

Hostas with variety of Tiger Lillies and Hydrangeas – These should brighten up your home.

Recipe of the Week

A favorite memory of mine when I think of rhubarb sticky buns or rhubarb cinnamon rolls is of a friend and mentor Ruth Shepard. While I met Ruth through Farm Bureau, her skill sets of a 4-H leader/mentor and her farm upbringing rang true when you met her. She was a wonderful cook, genuine laugh and love for life and the people she met. While this is not her recipe, it is a recipe that reminds me of her. May this recipe warm your heart and soul like Ruth’s friendship did to all that new her.

Homemade Rhubarb Sticky Buns

1 package (16 ounces) hot roll mix

4 tablespoons sugar, divided

1 cup warm water (120° to 130°)

1 large egg, lightly beaten

2 tablespoons plus 1/2 cup butter, softened, divided

2 cups sliced fresh or frozen rhubarb

1/2 cup packed brown sugar

1/2 cup light corn syrup

2 teaspoons ground cinnamon

1. In a large bowl, combine the contents of roll mix and yeast packets with 2 tablespoons sugar. Stir in the water, egg and 2 tablespoons butter to form a soft dough. Turn onto a floured surface. Knead until smooth, about 5 minutes. Cover and let rest for 5 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, in a large saucepan, combine the rhubarb, brown sugar, corn syrup and remaining butter. Bring to a boil; cook and stir for 3 minutes. Pour into an ungreased 13×9-in. baking dish.

3. On a lightly floured surface, roll dough into a 15×10-in. rectangle. Combine cinnamon and remaining sugar; sprinkle over dough.

4. Roll-up jelly-roll style, starting with a long side; pinch seam to seal. Cut into 12 slices. Place cut side down over rhubarb sauce. Cover and let rise in a warm place until doubled, about 30 minutes.

5. Bake at 375° for 20-25 minutes or until golden brown. Immediately invert onto a serving platter. Serve warm.

The Journey

The Journey

So often, we focus on the destination of where we are going. That we don’t stop to reflect on the journey of how we got there. When we are working outside towards a goal, I often reflect on this. For example, the weed and insect management/control journey is long, continuous and arduous…we just want to be done! Once the destination is achieved, we feel accomplished. Along that journey, we have conversations, experience sunrises and sunsets, see lightning bugs, baby birds and more. The journey can be memorable when we pause to notice what’s around us and reflect.

I feel the same as the boys go through their 4-H livestock journeys. One such journey is coming to a close this week, as Keith finalizes everything with raising meat birds. It has been an interesting and challenging journey raising a larger number of birds than what he was used to. The crop price increases caused feed prices to rise causing increased input costs, and weather temperature lows and extreme highs created learned moments of challenges and disappointment.

 As a parent, I saw him be an ingenuitive, resilient caretaker of his birds. With a goal of the birds having a healthy and good life and in the end providing healthy food for people he knows and cares about. While in the beginning, the end destination was earned income. The journey provided opportunities for personal growth beyond measure that will last him a lifetime.

“If all difficulties were known at the outset of a long journey, most of us would never start out at all.” – Dan Rather

Garden Science

The National Drought Mitigation Center, U.S. Department of Agricultura (USDA) and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) have a joint effort to create the U.S. Drought Monitor. This map shows drought conditions across Minnesota using a five-category system. Our area is among the 55.7% of Minnesota is in D1-Moderate Drought. If you aren’t aware, you should be aware that many parts of the U.S. are in a severe drought. Watch for this to impact crops from those areas. Crops need water to grow.

Pick-Up and Delivery

Remember that pick-up and deliveries will be on the schedule you have arranged with Harner Brothers CSA – please note the exceptions to this which were in the email. Please follow the CDC and MDH guidelines and COVID-19 procedures in email.

It is your responsibility to know that the pick-up or drop-off time will occur at the agreed upon time, and it is your responsibility as a shareholder to know this and be responsible for the produce at that time. If you are unable to utilize your share that week, it is still your responsibility: find someone else to pick it up or donate it to the food shelf.

Each box is labeled for each family. The same boxes will be used for your family throughout the season. Boxes and containers should be returned the following week. Bags will only be used once.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

The Harner Bros are the 5th generation to raise this rhubarb originally planted on the family farm near Tracy by their great-great grandparents after immigrating from Norway and transplanted to our home near Northfield.

The Harner Bros are the 5th generation to raise this rhubarb originally planted on the family farm near Tracy by their great-great grandparents after immigrating from Norway and transplanted to our home near Northfield.

After washing your rhubarb. Cut off both ends and cut it into 1/4 inch – 1/2 inch pieces. Now you are ready to use it in a recipe or freeze it.

Rhubarb – One-pound equals about 3 cups. Wash, cut the ends off, cut off any bad parts damaged by wind, chop into 1/4 – 1/2-inch pieces. No need to peel. You can freeze it in a Ziploc bag (no blanching) and use for months to come. Our family loves it in muffins, breads, jam, pie, crisp, sauce and torte. Check out these recipes at Martha Stewart. One more week most likely for this crop.

Spinach and Beet Leaves– Love this in a salad by itself or in sandwiches. Wash it and enjoy. Try this salad.

Outrageous Red Lettuce and Black Seeded Simpson – So grateful this crop seems to thrive on dry weather. Lovely color for sandwiches and salads. This crop was cooled with well water to take the field heat off. It was not washed.

Beets are a favorite of mine. Some like to peel and cut up and eat raw. I prefer mine cooked with a dab of butter.

Beets – A few Dark Red Detroit Beets for you to enjoy. Eat them raw cut up in your salads.

French Breakfast Radishes

French Breakfast Radish – Love the variegated look of this vegetable. The dry weather is making this crop unpredictable. Check out these recipes from Martha Stewart.

Cherry Belle Radish – Add great flavor and color to a salad. My mom loves a radish sandwich…sliced radishes between two slices of buttered bread.

Hostas with variety of greens and flowers – These should brighten up your home.

Recipe of the Week

Ingredients

  • 4 cups sliced fresh or frozen rhubarb from about 15-16 ounces
  • 3- ounce box strawberry jello or any red jello
  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 1 15.25-ounce box white or yellow cake mix*
  • 1/2 cup butter melted (salted butter is better here)
  • 2 cups cold water

Instructions

  1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Lightly spray a 13- by 9-inch baking dish with cooking spray.
  2. Arrange the rhubarb in an even layer in the bottom of the baking dish. Sprinkle the Jello over that, then top with the sugar.
  3. Sprinkle the yellow cake mix powder over all of that, then top with the melted butter and the cold water. Bake for 45 minutes to an hour, until the top is lightly browned and the rhubarb is bubbling.
  4. It’s possible to serve the dump cake warm but it’s MUCH easier to serve if you chill it for a couple of hours, until it sets up a bit. Serve with whipped cream or ice cream if desired.
  5. Uneaten cake can be stored in the fridge, covered, for up to 4 days or frozen (tightly wrapped) for up to 2 months

Source: The Itsy Bitsy Kitchen