Digging in to Share Science in Agriculture

 

Weeding is continuous. Not one of our favorite jobs, but it is a necessary one.

Weeding is continuous. Not one of our favorite jobs, but it is a necessary one. Weeds inhibit the crops to reach their full growing and production potential.

As the boys wrap-up their school year, we also wrapped up some of the agriculture in the classroom projects in their classrooms. They suggested that we share our Kindergarten potato experiment results. The experiments were pretty interesting. Agriculture in the classroom activities provide a great opportunity to share science in the classroom.

Don’t let the learning stop just because summer is here. Check out the Minnesota Agriculture in the Classroom , My American Farm and the American Farm Bureau Foundation for Agriculture websites for resources.

We did an experiment in Sam's kindergarten growing potatoes inside during the colder months in Minnesota to find out where the plant put it's energy and why. This plant put it's energy into growing more leaves above ground and less energy producing potatoes below ground. The plant was 8 foot 3 inches tall and produced 78 pebble sized potatoes.

We did an experiment in Sam’s kindergarten growing potatoes inside during the colder months in Minnesota to find out where the plant put it’s energy and why. This plant put it’s energy into growing more leaves above ground and less energy producing potatoes below ground. The plant was 8 foot 3 inches tall and produced 78 pebble sized potatoes.

Sam next to the potatoes in our garden that have been hilled twice this season. These potatoes will be about 2 feet high by end of season and will produce potatoes the size you find in the grocery store. Potato plants outside during the growing season in Minnesota put their energy into making potatoes below ground versus trying or reach for as much sunlight and warmth as possible like we saw in the kindergarten experiment.

Sam is next to the potatoes in our garden that have been hilled twice this season. These potatoes will be about 2 feet high by end of season and will produce potatoes the size you find in the grocery store. Potato plants outside during the growing season in Minnesota put their energy into making potatoes below ground versus trying to reach for as much sunlight and warmth as possible like we saw in the kindergarten experiment.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

Rhubarb – One pound equals about 3 cups. Wash, cut the ends off, cut off any bad parts damaged by wind, chop into 1/4 – 1/2 inch pieces. No need to peel. You can freeze it in a Ziploc bag (no blanching) and use for months to come. Our family loves it in muffins, breads, jam, pie, crisp, sauce and torte. Check out Taste of Home rhubarb recipe ideas.

Asparagus from Chute's Farm - delicious!

Asparagus from Chute’s Farm Fresh Gardens – delicious!

Asparagus – Fresh cut asparagus from the Chute’s Farm Fresh Gardens in Aitkin, Minnesota. These farmers are friends of ours who we know from Farm Bureau and also the Minnesota Agriculture and Rural Leadership Program. They had some extra they wanted to share with us, and the delivery time worked out well. They snap the asparagus vs. cutting so that you are getting all edible stalk and should have very minimal amount that you do not eat.  Enjoy! Learn the history of asparagus on America’s Heartland.

Black Seeded Simpson Lettuce – One of my favorite garden crops. Some of the crops are ran under cold well water to take the field heat off of them so they last longer in your refrigerators. They are not washed – just cooled. So remember to wash your vegetables before eating. See how lettuce is grown throughout the year so it is available in our grocery stores even on our cold Minnesota days.

Prizeleaf Lettuce

Prizeleaf Lettuce

Prizeleaf and Red Oak Leaf Lettuce – I love these beautiful lettuces – Prizeleaf is green with reddish tips and Red Oak Leaf is a red lettuce leaf. They add such a wonderful color to salads and sandwiches.

 

Spinach

Spinach

Spinach – remember to wash before eating. A combination of these vegetables will make such a wonderful meal! Check out some Cooking Light’s spinach recipes.

Beet/Beet Leaves – These are young plants that we are thinning out of the rows – eat the whole plant in a salad – delicious. It will add color and nutrition to your salads. Learn more here.

Radishes – French Breakfast radishes this week – a taste for your salads. There should be more next week, but with the projected heat for the weekend, I knew these would grow and split if not harvested for today’s boxes.

Herb – chives – wash then chop up chives into small pieces. I enjoy using them in potatoes on the grill.

Fresh cut arrangement – peonies and hosta leaves

Recipe of the Week

Strawberry Spinach Salad

Strawberry Spinach Salad – Super easy and delicious!

Strawberry Dressing

3 Tablespoons apple juice

2 Tablespoons strawberry spreadable fruit

2 Tablespoons balsamic vinegar

Salad

1 lb boneless skinless chicken breasts

8 cups bite-size pieces spinach

1 cup strawberries, stems removed and strawberries cut in half

1/4 cup crumbled Gorgonzola cheese (1 oz)

1/4 cup chopped walnuts

Directions
  1. In small bowl, mix all dressing ingredients until blended; set aside.
  2. Spray 10-inch skillet with cooking spray; heat over medium-high heat. Cook chicken in skillet 15 to 20 minutes, turning once, until juice of chicken is clear when center of thickest part is cut (170°F). Remove chicken to cutting board.
  3. Add dressing to skillet; stir to loosen any pan drippings.
  4. Cut chicken into slices. Among 4 plates, divide spinach. Top with chicken, strawberries and cheese. Drizzle with dressing. Sprinkle with walnuts.

Source: Taste of Home

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s