Full of Surprises

Full of Surprises

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Harvesting a few gourds and pumpkins to start the season. Enjoy!

We decided it was time to start harvesting pumpkins, winter squashes and gourds. Boy have we been surprised at all of the treasurers we are finding. We are always amazed at what we find once the leaves start to die and reveal what they have been helping to grow.

We hope that you to will be constantly surprised each week as we start bringing out more of the harvest at these beautiful delights to brighten your homes and doorsteps. May they bring smiles to your faces as much as they bring smiles to ours.

Garden Science

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

Lettuces Should return next week especially with this weather.

Basil and Cilantro If you are in need of some fresh basil, Cilantro or Dill to dry or freeze, we have some.

Purple and Green BeansSuch a delicious vegetable cooked, eaten raw or in salads.

Sweet Savour Hybrid Peppers – They may be small, but they pack quite the taste. The beautiful and tasty tricolor fruit looks like hot peppers but eats like sweet peppers.

Mama Mia Giallo HybridTapered 7–9″ fruits are smooth-skinned and uniform in shape. Prized as one of the earliest sweet peppers of its size—fruit ripens just 80 days after transplanting. Excellent fresh, roasted, or grilled.

Purple and Green Bell Peppers – Sweet Carnival Mix which are all classic bell hybrids.

Pepper, Hot, Serrano Tampiqueno – Heat-lovers, here’s another Mexican favorite used in a variety of dishes, from salsas to soups. Heat scale is about 3,00-0 Scovilles.

Carrots – Esperanza carrots – enjoy these summer delights. This new crop is out of the garden versus the raised bed.

Kohlrabi So glad that the insects didn’t win this time on this crop. Peel and cut like an apple eat raw, in salads or dip the slices in peanut butter. Enjoy!

Onions –If you are feeling overloaded on onions, cut them up and spread them out and freeze on a cookie sheet or pan. Once frozen place in a container or a Ziploc bag for use throughout the year. I do this and am just coming to my end of frozen onions. This helps speed up my meal preparation. See how onions are grown in Washington.

Potatoes – Kennebec and Blue potatoes are in your boxes this week.

Sweet PotatoesSweet potato has a rich history and interesting origin. It is one of the oldest vegetables known to mankind. Scientists believe that sweet potato was domesticated thousands of years ago in Central America. Learn more about sweet potatoes here.

Golden Egg Hybrid Summer Squash – This crop is slowly coming on with either Golden Egg Hybrid great to wash and slice to eat on a veggie tray, use on a kabob or try it sautéed in a little olive oil, salt and pepper.

Peter Pan Squash – No need to peel, simply wash and cut up this squash and use like the others. Check out these recipes.

ZucchiniThis crop has been a bit slow due to our insect challenges this year. But it is coming on. So like the cauliflower and kohlrabi we are alternating it around the shareholders. Enjoy – here are some recipes from Country Living.

Tomatoes – Let us know if you would like extra to freeze, make into salsa, or can. Included this week are some of the 4th of July, Super Sweet 100 Hybrid, SunGold Cherry tomatoes and a few more varieties sprinkled in. Learn more about tomatoes on America’s Heartland. Learn how to freeze your tomatoes here.

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Butternut Squash

Butternut Squash– This is our family favorite of squashes. It is hourglass in shape. Here are a few recipes for Butternut Squash from Martha Stewart.

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Carnival Squash

Carnival Squash – Carnival squash has variegated patterns of orange and green colors and is a hybrid of the sweet dumpling squash and the acorn squash. When cooked its texture is soft and melting with a fragrant aroma and its flavor; slightly nutty, buttery, and sweet with nuances of maple syrup, similar to that of butternut squash. This squash has contains potassium, vitamin A, and vitamin C, as well as, some calcium, magnesium, folate, omega-3 fatty acids and omega-6 fatty acids.

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Uchiki Kuri Winter Squash

Uchiki Kuri Winter Squash – This is a popular squash that has attractive orange-red skin. Yellow and creamy flesh is very sweet and nutty. It is a Hubbard type squash and sometimes also referred to as a baby red hubbard type since its appearance is like that of a petite hubbard. The word “kuri” translates to mean chestnut in Japanese, the main flavor profile found in the Red Kuri squash. It is a squash is a good source of vitamin A and vitamin C as well as potassium and iron. Hard-skinned Red Kuri squash can be difficult to peel and are most easily cooked in their skin. Split squash in half, scoop out seeds, and roast cut-side down until tender. Red Kuri can also be cut into wedges or cubes and roasted. The skin of Red Kuri once cooked is tender enough to consume so need not be removed prior to eating.

Name Pumpkins – We hope you enjoy this fall ornament

Gourds – Look for more to come – a lot of harvesting to be done.

Recipe of the Week

A favorite in our house thank you to my friend Sarah Durenberger at From the Farm Table.

Double Chocolate Zucchini Bread

1 cup Sugar

1 cup Brown Sugar

cup Vegetable Oil (I use apple sauce instead of the oil.)

4 Eggs

2 teaspoon Vanilla

2 cups Flour

1 cup Baking Cocoa

1 teaspoon Salt

1 1/2 teaspoon Baking Soda

1/2 teaspoon Baking Powder

1/2 teaspoon Cinnamon

1 cup Milk Chocolate Chips

3 cups Shredded Zucchini

  1. Beat sugars, oil, eggs and vanilla together. Mix dry ingredients. Stir into mixture. Add chocolate chips and shredded zucchini.
  2. Pour batter into 4-5 mini loaf pans (or 2 large loaf pans), coated with cooking spray.
  3. Bake at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for about 45 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Remove from pans and cool.

 

 

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Fall must be starting when the gourds and pumpkins are ready for harvest.

Fall harvest is upon us and the many fall colors are exploding from the garden. This weekend we tried out the potato digger and were able to dig out a lot of potatoes in a short time. We also stared harvesting winter squash, gourds and pumpkins.

We look forward to you enjoying the beautiful colors and joys that the fall will bring as we harvest the crops.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

Black Seeded Simpson Lettuce – The last crop of lettuce is coming in. It should love this cold weather. Some of the crops are ran under cold well water to take the field heat off of them so they last longer in your refrigerators. They are not washed – just cooled. So remember to wash your vegetables before eating. A new crop should be in next week.

Red Salad Bowl Lettuce – New crop – Beautiful color.

Spinach – New crop – Mix together with the above lettuces for a beautiful colored salad.

Purple Beans – Check out this recipe, and how green beans are raised in other areas of the U.S. on America’s Heartland. A few of you have some purple beans mixed in with the green beans.

Purple Vienna Kohlrabi – Try these ideas from Martha Stewart.

Detroit Dark Red BeetsSome of our shareholders enjoy eating them raw in their salads.

Green Bell Peppers – Learn how to make stuffed peppers here.

Banana Pepper – I have been cutting up and freezing the peppers with the intent to use them for recipes throughout the season.

Cherry Stuffer Hybrid sweet peppers – These are the small, round red peppers.

Onion – Wondering what to do with all of your onions? I cut mine up using my Pampered Chef chopper, place in Ziploc bags and place in the freezer. That way, my onions are always handy for recipes throughout the year.

Tomatoes – If you are considering canning quantities or wanting to freeze some for this winter, let us know. For the record we harvest 245 pounds this week.

Cucumbers – A new crop of a smaller variety of cucumbers is coming in. Maybe you want to can some or are interested in refrigerator pickles. 

Carrots – See how carrots are grown in Georgia on America’s Heartland.

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Red Kabocha Squash

Red Kabocha Squash – This winter squash tastes similar to sweet potatoes.

 

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Carnival Squash

Carnival Squash – Carnival squash is a hybrid of the sweet dumpling squash and the acorn squash. The color variance in the rind of the Carnival squash is the result of seasonal temperature variations. Warmer temperatures produce Carnival squash with slightly more pronounced green stripes. The squash’s flavor is nutty and sweet.

 

Peter Pan, Scallop Squash – This squash is a circular scalloped summer squash. Distinctive, delicious, and sweet flavor. It is not necessary to peel this squash before eating it. Cut it up like you would zucchini to grill it.

Summer Squash, Golden Egg Hybrid – Are you wondering how to use this summer squash – see how to cut it up here. Golden Egg’s a picture-perfect gourmet sensation-with succulent flavor and texture.

Zucchini – This crop is coming to an end. Shred and mix up your favorite zucchini bread recipe – freeze the dough, and you are ready for a quick breakfast treat on a chilly Fall day.

Sweet Corn – Thank you to our neighbors, the Peterson family, for contributing the sweet corn in this week’s box. Quick Tip: If you don’t eat all the sweet corn you have cooked, cut it off the cob and freeze it in a container. Reheat your frozen corn for your vegetable at another meal or use in a hot dish or a soup.

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Keith was busy harvesting potatoes this weekend. We are starting to clear some of these crops out – one of which was the potatoes.

Kennebec – Excellent for baked potatoes.

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Just love the variety of shapes and colors of the gourds.

Flowers – a variety of gourds

 

Recipe of the Week

10-7-12 tomato juice

Tomato Juice – the boys are selling tomato juice and salsa. Let us know if you are interested.

Tomato Juice

The tomato juice you received this week is a blend of all the tomatoes we are growing in the garden. I use this as my base for making pizza sauce and spaghetti sauce. Below is my recipe.
Spaghetti Sauce and Pizza Sauce

1 quart of tomato juice

1 can 32 ounces

1 small onion

1 garlic clove crushed

Herbs to taste

Place above ingredients in a pan on the stove. Bring to a boil then simmer for about 5-10 minutes. Pour on pizza crust or spaghetti and enjoy.

Every Season is Unique

Every Season is Unique

Potato Harvest is in full swing.

Potato harvest is in full swing. Good team work was needed to dig these up. It’s always fun to find the giant potatoes in the group.

It’s amazing how every growing season is unique, and each year different things go better than others, whether it is planting, pest management, plant health, time management, soil health etc. Every year, we are learning something new and trying to apply what was learned previously to build upon doing better during that given year. Each year’s weather pattern is different with Mother Nature always being predictably unpredictable.

At this point in the growing season, we are excited as we examine the squash, pumpkins and popcorn. We are frustrated as we look at the negative insects and their effects on the broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and potatoes and exhausted with the number of plantings that we have done for sugar snap peas, lettuce and carrots.

But we are hopeful and excited as we see that the harvest year end is quickly going to be upon us. The reason we are so excited – because we love harvesting the pumpkins, squash, gourds, popcorn and ornamental corn. It truly is like Christmas in the garden. Take time to check out what is growing on before the craziness of school starts. It really is starting to change with September just around the corner. There is a lot to absorb and see.

Garden Science

Farmers and ranchers across the United States provide a great deal of wildlife habit. As we were working in the garden, we discovered this small nest of newly hatched birds. The boys were so excited to simply watch these young lives.

Farmers and ranchers across the United States provide a great deal of wildlife habit. As we were working in the garden, we discovered this small nest of newly hatched birds. The boys were so excited to simply watch these young lives.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating. Some of the crops are ran under cold well water to take the field heat off of them so they last longer in your refrigerators. They are not washed – just cooled. So remember to wash your vegetables before eating.  Thank you for your support of our CSA. Enjoy the produce!

Red Oak Leaf Lettuce – I have replanted this crop no less than 5 times, and we are starting to see a few varieties peek through the ground.

Kale – I use the Kale in moderation in my salads. It adds some beautiful color and more nutrients to the dish.

Green Beans – A new crop of Jade green beans.

Kohlrabi – Green kohlrabi in your box. Peel it and eat it like an apple.

Beets –  Detroit Dark Red Beets in your box. Boil on your stove top for about 1/2 hour – take them out of the water, using a paper towel gently rub the paper towel over the beet and the skins will come right off, slice into pieces and serve with butter.

Carrots – Purple Dragon and Nantes carrots that were planted at different times and in different soil types – your feedback is appreciated.

TomatoesA variety of 4th of July Hybrid, Sweet Tangerine Hybrid and Sun Gold Hybrid.

Peppers Cherry Stuffer Hybrid Sweet Pepper

Garlic – Enjoy the fresh garlic. I use a hand held garlic press crush and peel my garlic. It is awesome and definitely the tool of the week! Here are some garlic recipes to check out.

Onions –  yellow candy onions

Butternut Squash – My favorite squash. Check out the recipes from Martha Stewart.

Spaghetti Squash – I love using this squash instead of regular spaghetti. Learn how to cook this squash from Martha Stewart.

Spaghetti Squash on the left and Golden Egg Hybrid Summer Squash on the right.

Spaghetti Squash on the left and Golden Egg Hybrid Summer Squash on the right.

Golden Egg Hybrid Summer Squash –  Check out some squash soup recipes.

Zucchini – The zucchini is still producing. So since we had extra, we made you some Double Chocolate Zucchini Bread. See recipe below.

Red Norland Potatoes – Red Norland potatoes are versatile potatoes – great for boiling, potato salad and I have had success with them as French fries.

Kennebec Potatoes – Great baking potato.

Cilantro, Basil and Parsley – Plenty to share – take a snip or a plant home and freeze or dry the herb for use in stews, etc during the rest of the year. Here are some more ideas on how to preserve herbs.

Fresh cut arrangement – Zinnias, Hydrangeas, and sunflowers

Recipe of the Week

A favorite in our house. Find this recipe and more ideas on my friend’s blog at From the Farm Table.

Double Chocolate Zucchini Bread

1 cup Sugar

1 cup Brown Sugar

1 cup Vegetable Oil (I use apple sauce instead of the oil.)

4 Eggs

2 teaspoon Vanilla

2 cups Flour

1 cup Baking Cocoa

1 teaspoon Salt

1 1/2 teaspoon Baking Soda

1/2 teaspoon Baking Powder

1/2 teaspoon Cinnamon

1 cup Milk Chocolate Chips

3 cups Shredded Zucchini

1. Beat sugars, oil, eggs and vanilla together. Mix dry ingredients. Stir into mixture. Add chocolate chips and shredded zucchini.

2. Pour batter into 4-5 mini loaf pans (or 2 large loaf pans), coated with cooking spray.

3. Bake at 350 degrees for about 45 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean. Remove from pans and cool.

 

Finding Commonalities

Finding Commonalities

Enjoying the evening sunset together as we harvested sweet corn. In the end, we all just want more quality time with our loved ones. No technology, just Mother Nature and good conversation.

Enjoying the evening sunset together as we harvested sweet corn. In the end, we all just want more quality time with our loved ones. No technology, just Mother Nature and good conversation.

Whether at a baseball game or at the dentist office, we end up discussing summer activities with our kids, challenges as working moms balancing summer schedules, and concern for our kids as they enter into a new school year. We share a lot of the same concerns even though, what we have most in common is being parents, and the love we have for our children.

These conversation also end up including our CSA or questions they have about farming. Questions range from how our CSA is doing with the weather to what’s working and what’s not working compared to what they are experiencing or seeing in their area. These conversations are often times with friends that grew up in town and/or currently reside in town. We also discussed how the food is grown and technologies in agriculture. We, meaning all four of us, enjoy the conversations and the opportunity to help others gain a better understanding for how food is grown.

We are happy to answer questions that others have about what we do. What matters, is that in life we are always learning. After all, it is simply fun and interesting to learn how food is grown and raised to feed our families.

 

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating. Some of the crops are ran under cold well water to take the field heat off of them so they last longer in your refrigerators. They are not washed – just cooled. So remember to wash your vegetables before eating.  Thank you for your support of our CSA. Enjoy the produce!

Red Oak Leaf Lettuce – I think God is trying to give you a break on lettuce. I have replanted this crop no less than 5 times. I see a variety is peeking through the ground.

Spinach  – The spinach is in the lettuce salad mix this week. It doesn’t like the heat we have been receiving.

Kale – I use the Kale in moderation in my salads. It adds some beautiful color and more nutrients to the dish.

Kohlrabi – You either have a purple or green kohlrabi in your box. Peel it and eat it like an apple.

Purple Beans – Just a taste this week.

These were some overgrown beets.

These were some overgrown beets.

Beets –  Detroit Dark Red Beets in your box. Check out how to cook them here.

Cherry Belle RadishesThey may be small but their taste is mighty. Enjoy in a salad or a radish sandwich – on buttered bread.

Carrots

Golden Egg Hybrid Summer Squash –  The best-tasting squash in Burpee’s taste trials for 2 years in a row.

Zucchini – The zucchini is still producing. Wondering when it will slow down.

Cucumbers – This crop is dwindling. You will get a break from cucumbers shortly until a new variety of this crop comes in.

Plenty of tomatoes to harvest.

Plenty of tomatoes to harvest.

TomatoesA variety abounds for you this week.

Peppers Green Bell Peppers

Garlic – Enjoy the fresh garlic. I use a hand held garlic press crush and peel my garlic. It is awesome and definitely the tool of the week! Here are some garlic recipes to check out.

Onions –  Snow White hybrid and Giant Red Hamburger onions.

sweet corn

Sam’s neatly stacked sweet corn.

Sweet Corn – One of summer’s favorites.

Spaghetti Squash – I love using this squash instead of regular spaghetti. Learn how to cook this squash from Martha Stewart.

Red Norland Potatoes – Red Norland potatoes are versatile potatoes – great for boiling, potato salad and I have had success with them as French fries.

Yukon Gold Potatoes

Yukon Gold Potatoes

Yukon Gold Potatoes – A beautiful golden variety of potato.  Learn some fun facts about potatoes grown in Minnesota and the Northern Plains here.

Cilantro, Basil and Parsley – Plenty to share – take a snip or a plant home and freeze or dry the herb for use in stews, etc during the rest of the year.

Fresh cut arrangement – Zinnias and sunflowers

Recipe of the Week

These zucchini brownies are a favorite.

These zucchini brownies are a favorite.

Zucchini Brownies

Ingredients

•2 cups all-purpose flour

•1/3 cup baking cocoa

•1-1/2 teaspoons baking soda

•1 teaspoon salt

•2 cups shredded zucchini

•1-1/2 cups sugar

•3/4 cup vegetable oil (I will substitute with applesauce.)

•1/2 cup chopped walnuts

•2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Frosting

•1/4 cup butter, cubed

•1 cup sugar

•1/4 cup milk

•1/2 cup semisweet chocolate chips

•1/2 cup miniature marshmallows

•1 teaspoon vanilla extract

•1/2 cup chopped walnuts, optional

 

•In a large bowl, combine the flour, cocoa, baking soda and salt. In a small bowl, combine the zucchini, sugar and oil; stir into dry ingredients until blended. Stir in walnuts and vanilla.

•Pour into a greased 13-in. x 9-in. baking pan. Bake at 350° F. for 35-40 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack for 30 minutes.

•In a large saucepan, melt butter; stir in sugar and milk. Bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring frequently. Cook and stir 1 minute or until smooth. Remove from the heat. Stir in chips and marshmallows until melted and smooth; add vanilla. Spread over brownies. Sprinkle with walnuts if desired. Yield: 2 dozen.

Source: Taste of Home

Stand up, Stand Tall

Stand up, Stand Tall

Welcome Minnie and Daisy to the farm.

Welcome Minnie and Daisy to the farm. Barn cats play an important part of controlling field mice and other rodents around our place. As you can tell, we all love having these kittens around.

Thank you to everyone who expressed concern over how our crops fared the storms. We are happy to share (see photo below) that they have recovered as much as can be expected. They have stood back up, standing tall and looking like a crop is in their future. I shared the photos last week as an opportunity to help everyone better understand what happens to farmers’ crops when storms roll through.

One comment from our blog post sticks out – “After all my years of farming, one thing I have learned, is that we do everything we can to ensure that the crop we put in the ground will grow and reap a harvest with whatever weather conditions Mother Nature gives us. If you were thinking positively when you planted it, chances are…it will be ok.”

This comment reminded me that farming presents more learning lessons than one realizes. In fact, it reminds me a lot of life and parenting. We do all we can to ensure that we are helping our children grow up to be productive, loving and caring people who provide back to this world more than they have been given. We think positively about their future. While we are preparing them, similar to preparing to growing a crop, we do the best we can hoping that whatever storms come their way in life that they to, like the corn, will stand back up, stand tall and reap a productive lifetime.

Garden Science

This is a photo of the top of the corn plant last week.

This is a photo of the top of the corn plant last week. Take time to check out the different plants. They really are unique.

The ornamental corn leaf feels different then the...

The ornamental corn leaf feels different then the…

broom corn leaf...

broom corn leaf…

then the field corn leaf. All are unique to the type of corn variety that it is.

then the field corn leaf. All are unique to the type of corn variety that it is.

Great news. All types of corn are standing back up on their own. When I refer to types I mean: sweet corn, field corn, ornamental corn, broom corn and popcorn. Corn genetics are an amazing thing. Thanks to plant scientists these plant varieties were able to withstand that strong wind and straighten back up to keep on growing. I think it also helped that we were all praying for this to happen. God is good!

Great news. All types of corn are standing back up and standing tall on their own. When I refer to types I mean: sweet corn, field corn, ornamental corn, broom corn and popcorn. Corn genetics are an amazing thing. Thanks to the plant scientists, these plant varieties were able to withstand that strong wind and straighten back up to keep on growing. I think it also helped that we were all praying for this to happen. God is good!

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating. Some of the crops are ran under cold well water to take the field heat off of them so they last longer in your refrigerators. They are not washed – just cooled. So remember to wash your vegetables before eating. 

Black Seeded Simpson Lettuce – With a lot of lettuce in your boxes, check out Martha Stewart’s lettuce salad recipes or this potluck taco idea for picnics and family gatherings. 

Prizeleaf and Red Oak Leaf Lettuce – I love these beautiful lettuces – Prizeleaf is green with reddish tips and Red Oak Leaf is a red lettuce leaf. They add such a wonderful color to salads and sandwiches.

Spinach and Beet Leaves – We thinned our beets and have combined them with the spinach for a healthy salad mix.

Carrots

Carrots

Carrots – Some beautiful carrots this week.

Kale – Here are some recipes for this vegetable. Two varieties Dwarf Blue Curled Vates and Ursa Kale.

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi

Kohlrabi – You either have a purple or green kohlrabi in your box.

Beet –  Dark Detroit Red Beets – Learn how to cook beets here.

 

Picking green beans can literally be exhausting.

Picking green beans can literally be exhausting.

Green Beans – Plenty are growing – let us know if you would like any to can or freeze. Here are some recipe ideas.

Watermelon Radish

Watermelon Radish

Radishes – Watermelon radishes – let us know what you think about this vegetable.

Golden Egg Hybrid Summer Squash –  The best-tasting squash in Burpee’s taste trials for 2 years in a row.

Quite the zucchini and summer squash harvest this week.

The zucchini and summer squash harvest this week.

Zucchini – The zucchini is growing like crazy. Learn how to save it for use during the cold winter months From the Farm Table and try some of the recipe ideas from Martha Stewart.

Onions – red onions – These onions took a beating in the storms. They had stopped growing so we harvested them this week.

Fresh Basil – some of you have basil in your herb pots and some do not. Check out these basil ideas.

Fresh cut arrangement – Zinnias

Recipe of the Week

Cinnamon Zucchini Bread

Cinnamon Zucchini Bread

Cinnamon Zucchini Bread

Ingredients

3 Eggs, beaten

1 cup Sugar

1 cup Brown Sugar

1 cup applesauce

3 cups Flour (opt: substitute 1 cup Whole Wheat Flour)

1 tsp Baking Soda

1 tsp Salt

1/4 tsp Baking Powder

1/4 tsp Cinnamon

2 cups Zucchini, shredded

Shredding zucchini is super easy and fun with this salad shooter.

Shredding zucchini is super easy and fun with this salad shooter.

Instructions

Beat together the eggs, sugars and applesauce.

Stir together all the dry ingredients and add to the egg-sugar mixture. Stir in the shredded zucchini.

Coat four mini loaf pans with cooking spray. Sprinkle sugar on the bottom. Pour batter evenly in all four pans. Sprinkle tops with sugar.

Bake at 325 degrees for 45-50 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean.

Spring has Sprung

Spring has Sprung

Spring always brings smiles, from seeing the first Robins appear to the first flowers blooming to the smell of soil and the smell of spring rains. Spring is simply exciting. This week we were in the field and were able to accomplish quite a bit because of the cooperative weather. The soil temps are warming up. The rain, while welcome, is just enough to settle the dust.

Thank you to our neighbor, the Quinnels, for loaning us the tractor and tiller to try out. It sure was efficient and welcome pieces of equipment.

Thank you to our neighbor, Keith Quinnell, for loaning us the tractor and tiller to try out. It sure was efficient and welcome pieces of equipment.

We drug out the ends to even out the soil for a nice seed bed and seeded some of our grass field roads and pasture that needed to be replanted.

We drug out the ends to even out the soil for a nice seed bed and seeded some of our grass field roads and pasture that needed to be replanted.

We decided last year that the raised bed garden will be our carrot sampling garden for our shareholders.

We decided last year that the raised bed garden will be our carrot sampling garden for our shareholders.

We planted many crops this weekend: lettuces, spinach, kale, sugar snap peas, carrots, radishes, beets, onions, potatoes, kohlrabi, cabbages, broccoli and cauliflower.

We planted many crops this weekend: lettuces, spinach, kale, sugar snap peas, carrots, radishes, beets, onions, potatoes, kohlrabi, cabbages, broccoli and cauliflower.

Math Corner

We planted five varieties of potatoes: Yukon Gold, Kennebec, Dark Red Norland, Masquerade and Blue potatoes. We planted 20 rows with 60 per row, how many potato plants were planted? Yes, we planted 1,200 potato plants.

We planted five varieties of potatoes: Yukon Gold, Kennebec, Dark Red Norland, Masquerade and Blue potatoes. We planted 20 rows with 60 per row, how many potato plants were planted? Yes, we planted 1,200 potato plants.

Garden Science

We also were rock picking this week. We had a great question - do you have to rock pick every year? The answer is yes. Our Minnesota weather with the freezing and thawing seem to push up rocks out of the ground on a regular basis. Not all the rocks are the same. There are many different types of rocks found in Minnesota. So while picking rock can get monotonous, the types of rocks do help to make the job more like a treasure hunt.

We also were rock picking this week. We had a great question – do you have to rock pick every year? The answer is yes. Our Minnesota weather with the freezing and thawing seem to push up rocks out of the ground on a regular basis. Not all the rocks are the same. There are many different types of rocks found in Minnesota. So while picking rock can get monotonous, the types of rocks do help to make the job more like a treasure hunt.

 

 

 

 

 

Dance like no one’s watching

Dance like no one’s watching

Pumpkins etched with Care for your Families. Thank you for being a member of our CSA!

Pumpkins etched with Care for your Families. Thank you for being a member of our CSA!

The other night when we were working, I had the Happy station playing on Pandora. The songs were those that made you want to sing and dance. So the boys and I were singing and dancing like no one was watching. Their smiles and laughter were contagious, and the stress and our exhaustion from our days seemed to be pushed away.

It reminded of me of picking rock when I was growing up. Those were some long days in the field. Rock picking can be long, hot, boring work, but when we blared the radio on the tractor, the singing and the dancing ensued and laughter followed.

As we push for our fall cleanup to be completed, it’s these moments that I want to freeze in time. Time to be crazy, time to accomplish, time to learn and explore and time to have fun, all as a family.

Remember in the end, your kids simply want to laugh and play with you and dance like no one is watching.

Garden clean-up has begun. The boys used a shredder to break down the plants so that we can incorporate them into the soil.

Garden clean-up has begun. The boys used a shredder to break down the plants so that we can incorporate them into the soil.

Garden Science

So are you wondering how the names are created on your pumpkins? It begins at the end of July/beginning of August.

The boys carefully select pumpkins that they think go with the amount of letters in your last name and a pumpkin that will grow to be a nice size for your front porch.

The boys carefully select pumpkins that they think go with the amount of letters in your last name, and a pumpkin that will grow to be a nice size for your front porch.

Then using their great-great grandpa's wood working tools that were hand carved, they carefully etch out your last names in the pumpkin. This will then appear as a

Then using their great-great grandpa’s wood working tools that were hand carved, they carefully etch out your last names in the pumpkin. This will then appear as a “scar” on the skin of the pumpkin. A great way for the boys to work on their spelling, their letter writing and how to work gently with a young plant.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

Some of the crops are ran under cold well water to take the field heat off of them so they last longer in your refrigerators. They are not washed – just cooled. So wash your vegetables before eating.

Lettuce and Spinach – Enjoy this mix on some BLTs or salads.

Carrots – We are having a healthy crop. Hope you are enjoying them.

Green Beans – A little taste – We were surprised that the new crop of green beans and sugar snap peas were not quite ready. Both are blooming and those blooms will grow into the vegetables. Hoping next week.

Broccoli – Broccoli for your salads.

Kohlrabi – Maybe one more week??

Beets – Enjoy the beets before they are all harvested.

Yellow Onions

Cucumbers – Enjoy the “ugly” cucumbers:) The tail end of the cucumbers.

Peppers – A few green peppers with the small Habanero peppers. Choose a few tonight. Fun facts about peppers.

Tomato varieties abound.

Tomato varieties abound.

Tomatoes – Tomato varieties included in your boxes: Yellow Girls, Honey Delights, Big Boys, Roma, Fourth of July, Big Mammas, Honey Delights, Amish Paste and cherry tomatoes. The tomato crop is quickly slowing down. Let us know if you would like any to freeze or can.

Potatoes – Midnight Moon and Masquerade in your box this week. Additional varieties will reappear next week. Learn more about potatoes here.

We broke of the bad parts of the corn that had ear worm. Then boiled the good sweet corn for about 8-10 minutes and cut off the corn to freeze and enjoy throughout the year.

We broke of the bad parts of the corn that had ear worm. Then boiled the good sweet corn for about 8-10 minutes and cut off the corn to freeze and enjoy throughout the year.

Sweet Corn – After finding the earworm in way to many ears, this crop was shredded and will be incorporated into the soil to build soil health. We are looking into our options to prevent this pest next year while providing more sweet corn for your families to enjoy. We did salvage the good part of our ears, boiled them for 8-10 minutes in boiling water, cut the corn off the ears and froze the corn for us to enjoy the rest of the year.

Basil – Pull a plant, replant in your garden or use it fresh.

Melons – Choice of watermelon or cantaloupe. This is the end of the crop. Enjoy!

The boys had a great time harvesting your name pumpkins.

The boys had a great time harvesting your name pumpkins.

Pumpkins – The boys enjoyed etching your names into the young pumpkins a few weeks ago. So while they may not look exactly perfect, please know they were done with much joy for each of your families by the boys to show gratitude for your families to enjoy this fall.

What a variety of gourds we have this year. These two resembled snakes. We hope you enjoy your share. Look for more next week.

What a variety of gourds we have this year. These two resembled snakes. We hope you enjoy your share. Look for more next week.

Gourds – A variety of them abound from Baby Boos to egg gourds to Jack-Be-Littles and more. Enjoy your share this week and look for more next week.

The ornamental corn colors are beautiful.

The ornamental corn colors are beautiful.

Fresh cut arrangement – Ornamental corn – one bunch for each of you. This crop was beat up by winds and a few storms this year. We plan to increase the amount of plants planted next year.

Recipe of the Week

Butternut Squash

A family favorite! I freeze and use throughout the year in recipes that call for pumpkin.

1. Using a butcher knife, split the squash in half lengthwise. Place in a cake pan, put about 1/4 - 1/2 inch of water. Cover with aluminum foil and bake for at least an hour at 350 degrees Fahrenheit. 2. Remove from oven. peel off the skin using a knife or turn it over and scoop out cooked squash. Scoop out and remove the seeds - discard (seeds could be cooked using a pumpkin seed recipe). 3. Place cooked squash in bowl with 1/2 cup of stick butter and 3/4 cup of brown sugar. Mix and enjoy.

1. Using a butcher knife, split the squash in half lengthwise. Place in a cake pan, put about 1/4 – 1/2 inch of water. Cover with aluminum foil and bake for at least an hour at 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
2. Remove from oven. peel off the skin using a knife or turn it over and scoop out cooked squash. Scoop out and remove the seeds – discard (seeds could be cooked using a pumpkin seed recipe).
3. Place cooked squash in bowl with 1/2 cup of stick butter and 3/4 cup of brown sugar. Mix and enjoy.

Squash mixed up and ready to be eaten or frozen. I freeze mine in cupcake tins, after they are frozen I put them in a Ziploc bag and pull them out as needed for meals or when a recipe calls for pumpkin.

Squash mixed up and ready to be eaten or frozen. I freeze mine in cupcake tins, after they are frozen I put them in a Ziploc bag and pull them out as needed for meals or when a recipe calls for pumpkin.

Butternut Squash

1 squash

1/2 cup of stick butter

3/4 cup of brown sugar

1. Using a butcher knife, split the squash in half lengthwise. Place in a cake pan, put about 1/4 – 1/2 inch of water. Cover with aluminum foil and bake for at least an hour at 350 degrees Fahrenheit.
2. Remove from oven. peel off the skin using a knife or turn it over and scoop out cooked squash. Scoop out and remove the seeds – discard. Or seeds could be cooked using a pumpkin seed recipe.
3. Place cooked squash in bowl with 1/2 cup of stick butter and 3/4 cup of brown sugar. Mix and enjoy.

4. Once squash is mixed up and ready to be eaten or freeze in cupcake tin. After they are frozen I put them in a Ziploc bag and pull them out as needed for meals or when a recipe calls for pumpkin.

Sharing our Story

Sharing our Story

This past weekend, I had the joy and pleasure of teaching a young girl how to pick flowers. Picking flowers is a skill that I have taught my boys and my husband, and something we all take for granted. Much like the boys teaching other kids how to harvest carrots.

As I reflect on these experiences, I am reminded of why we encourage our boys to teach something each week in the garden. You see each week during our growing season, we encourage the boys to share something that is new or different that is “growing” on in the garden from insects to soil types to seeds to harvesting vegetables to eat on the way home etc. We encourage our children to continue to share the farm story wherever an opportunity is available, and they continue to amaze me.

Farm Fact: Over half of all Minnesotans have never met a farmer.

Keith working at the state fair sharing how farmers care for the animals, environment and producing food for families in our neighborhoods and around the world.

Keith working at the state fair sharing how farmers care for the animals, the environment and producing food for families in our neighborhoods and around the world.

This week, Keith joined me at the Minnesota State Fair at the Minnesota Farm Bureau booth answering consumer questions  and providing an opportunity for consumers to meet a farmer. He also worked at the Minnesota Farm Bureau Foundation’s Ag Cab Lab in the CHS Miracle of Birth Center helping families to better understand ethanol, and what it is like to drive a tractor. He had a great opportunity to help share what Minnesota Farm Bureau is doing at this year’s Minnesota State Fair on WCCO TV.

Sam sharing how the chicks have grown that they hatched at the Montessori, and how to tell the difference between roosters and hens.

Sam shared how the chicks that were hatched at the Montessori have grown, and taught the children how to tell the difference between roosters and hens.

This past school year, we hatched chicks in both of the boys’ classrooms. This summer, we brought the grown chickens into school to share with the children and show them how quickly poultry and animals change – a great science lesson! Sam did a great job leading this sharing time and describing the differences between roosters and hens.

While there are many different types of farms across Minnesota and the United States, we are happy to share our story with those who are interested and to help answer questions that you may have or connect you with farmers that would be able to answer them. You see the reason we enjoy sharing our story is because we like to see the joy in the faces when people connect and better understand. Much like the joy in a young girls face when she better understands how to harvest and pick a beautiful bouquet of flowers, or the smile on boys’ faces with their mouths outlined in dirt after eating freshly harvested carrots.

Science in the Garden

We spend quite a bit of time trying to identify insects. A cool one we found this week was the hummingbird moth. Learn more here.

We spend quite a bit of time trying to identify insects. A cool one we found this week was the hummingbird moth. Learn more here.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

Some of the crops are ran under cold well water to take the field heat off of them so they last longer in your refrigerators. They are not washed – just cooled. So wash your vegetables before eating.

Lettuce and Spinach – New crop looks delicious. We hope this will last us until the end of September.

Carrots – Interested to hear what you think. These carrots came out of a different soil type then the ones earlier this summer. Your feedback is appreciated.

Green Beans – A little taste – a new crop of green beans and sugar snap peas in the coming weeks to finish out the year. Check out this segment on America’s Heartland on green beans.

Broccoli

Kohlrabi is also starting to thin out.

Kohlrabi is also starting to thin out.

Kohlrabi – We may get one more week of this.

Beets – The beets will be coming to an end in a week or two.

Yellow Onions

Cucumbers are starting to come to an end, but we still filled a wagon full.

Cucumbers are starting to come to an end, but we still filled a wagon full.

Cucumbers – This crop will also be ending shortly.

Peppers on the other hand are producing. There are a few varieties to choose from.

Peppers on the other hand are producing. There are a few varieties to choose from.

Peppers – A variety – enjoy! Watch out a few of the small Habanero peppers. They are mighty.

We picked just a few tomatoes. If you would like to can or freeze extra to enjoy later. Please let us know.

We picked just a few tomatoes. If you would like to can or freeze extra to enjoy later. Please let us know.

Tomatoes – Tomato varieties included in your boxes: Yellow Girls, Honey Delights, Big Boys, Roma, Fourth of July, Big Mammas, Honey Delights, Amish Paste and cherry tomatoes.

Potatoes – Kennebec, Viking and Blue potatoes for your Labor Day holiday for Red, White and Blue potato salad.

Sweet Corn – Will return in a week or two.

Basil – A little for your potato salad.

Red or Green Cabbage – Here is a coleslaw to give a try at your weekend picnic.

Melons – Choice of watermelon or cantaloupe. Enjoy!

Fresh cut arrangement – A variety from sunflowers, Rudbeckia, straw flowers, marigolds and zinnias.

Recipe of the Week

Check out the links above for some tasty recipes. I was thinking, “What did I make from the garden this week?” I was reminded of this trusty favorite.

Tater Tot Hotdish

This is a family favorite and an easy way to use many of your fresh or frozen vegetables.

Brown:

1 pound of hamburger

1 Tablespoon onion

In a casserole dish mix in:

1 can of Cream of Mushroom/Cream of Chicken Soup

Frozen corn, peas and/or green beans

Top with tater tots (I was curious to see how some potatoes cut into French fries would work, but I have not tried that yet.)

Cook in 350 degree Fahrenheit oven for 1/2 hour or until edges are bubbling. Enjoy!

Enjoy! Sometimes the boys like to eat it with ketchup on it.

Enjoy! Sometimes the boys like to eat it with ketchup on it.

Exhaustion finds Peace

Exhaustion finds Peace

The boys used one of the beets that was way to small to make warrior paint.

The boys used one of the beets that was way to small to make warrior paint.

Our evening concluded last night with, Sam falling asleep at the table while eating his supper, and Keith going to bed with a smile on his face. You may be wondering why did Sam fall asleep at the table? You see we ate supper at 9:30 p.m. This is not unlike what I grew up doing on our family farm, or what I know other farm families do.

You see we harvest some of our crops the evening before pick-up (cucumbers, sweet corn, tomatoes etc,) and early in the morning of the day of pick-up trying to avoid harvesting during the heat of the day.

We arrived home from our off farm jobs and the boys activities. All of us were exhausted. We all would have much rather played catch or laid on the couch. But we knew the work needed to be done, so we grabbed a Schwan’s ice cream bar which always brings a smile to the boys faces and headed to the field.

I tried to keep everyone focused and separated to avoid the exhausted brother fights. Once Steve arrived, we split into harvesting teams allowing for one on one time with our kids. Just us and Mother Nature on a beautiful summer evening having good conversation with our kids, marveling at the interesting finds in the garden and enjoying the beautiful color of the sunset.

As we cleaned up for the evening, everyone’s moods had changed for the better. They were happy, peaceful, helpful and calm.

So while I was concerned at the time we were eating supper, all of us felt good at what had been accomplished. As I put our oldest to bed, I mentioned to him how peaceful he looked, and how the exhaustion and angst were gone. He agreed that the time spent together outside brought peace and was a good way to end the day.

So now you know one of the many reasons farm families don’t mind the late meals together after working to accomplish a bigger task. When I reflect back on my childhood, I remember those times with fondness and know that those were the days that built character, good work ethic and team work.

Garden Science

The seed potato can be seen at the base of the plant. So cool to see how the roots and the plant have grown from this and to find the delicious potatoes that it has grown.

The seed potato can be seen at the base of the plant. So cool to see how the roots and the plant have grown from this and to find the delicious potatoes that it has grown.

A young potato is attached and growing from the seed potato that we planted this spring.

A young potato is attached and growing from the seed potato that we planted this spring.

This is what we got when we pulled the potato plant out of the ground. There were a few more potatoes that were in the ground. Look closely and you can find the seed potato.

This is what we got when we pulled the potato plant out of the ground. There were a few more potatoes that were in the ground. Look closely and you can find the seed potato.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

Some of the crops are ran under cold well water to take the field heat off of them so they last longer in your refrigerators. They are not washed – just cooled. So wash your vegetables before eating.

Red Oak Leaf Lettuce – Beautiful red lettuce leaf. A new crop of lettuce and spinach has emerged. Hoping that it will be ready next week.

Kale – I will be trying this vegetable in place of lettuce this week.

Carrots – Here is a good link to carrot recipes.

Green Beans/Purple Beans – A more manageable amount to try to freeze this week.

Sugar Snap Peas – Our third crop of peas was ready this week. Enjoy!

Broccoli – Have you been searching for new things to do with this vegetable. Here are a few ideas.

Kohlrabi – Here are some ideas for using your Kohlrabi.

Beets abound.

Beets abound.

Beets – Some history on this crop.

Yellow Onions – See how onions are raised by farmers in Idaho.

Zucchini and Summer Squash

Cucmbers abound we have Fanci Pak and Slicing Speedway (a lot like Straight 8).

Cucumbers abound we have Fanci Pak and Slicing Speedway (a lot like Straight 8).

Cucumbers – You received both varieties of cucumbers this week. Let us know if you are in need any for canning.

Peppers – a variety abound – enjoy!

Tomatoes – Tomato varieties included in your boxes: Yellow Girls, Honey Delights, Big Boys, Roma, Fourth of July, Big Mammas, Honey Delights, Amish Paste and cherry tomatoes.

Potatoes are like digging for gold. Tons of fun and hard work!

Potatoes are like digging for gold. Tons of fun and hard work!

Potatoes – Kennebecs – You’ll be enjoying potatoes for the rest of the season.

Sweet Corn – One of my favorites. Here is a way to freeze the corn before it gets to old in your refrigerator.

CilantroEnjoy in salsas, fajitas, eggs and more. Learn more about cilantro here.

Variety of flowers abound.

Variety of flowers abound.

Fresh cut arrangement – A variety from sunflowers, Rudbeckia, straw flowers, marigolds and zinnias.

Dill is available for canning, and it helps to draw in beneficial insects.

Dill is available for canning, and it helps to draw in beneficial insects.

Fun Fact

We enjoy reading a lot of children’s agriculture books learning about different aspects of farming. One of our favorites is The Boy Who Changed the World. Give it a read – it’s a great way to get kids thinking about people around the world, and how they too can make a difference.

Recipe of the Week

Zucchini Brownies

Zucchini Brownies

Zucchini Brownies

Ingredients

  • 2 cups all-purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup baking cocoa
  • 1-1/2 teaspoons baking soda
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 cups shredded zucchini
  • 1-1/2 cups sugar
  • 3/4 cup vegetable oil (I substitute with applesauce.)
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Frosting

  • 1/4 cup butter, cubed
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 1/4 cup milk
  • 1/2 cup semisweet chocolate chips
  • 1/2 cup miniature marshmallows
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup chopped walnuts, optional
  • In a large bowl, combine the flour, cocoa, baking soda and salt. In a small bowl, combine the zucchini, sugar and oil; stir into dry ingredients until blended. Stir in walnuts and vanilla.
  • Pour into a greased 13-in. x 9-in. baking pan. Bake at 350° F. for 35-40 minutes or until a toothpick comes out clean. Cool on a wire rack for 30 minutes.
  • In a large saucepan, melt butter; stir in sugar and milk. Bring to a boil over medium heat, stirring frequently. Cook and stir 1 minute or until smooth. Remove from the heat. Stir in chips and marshmallows until melted and smooth; add vanilla. Spread over brownies. Sprinkle with walnuts if desired. Yield: 2 dozen.

Source: Taste of Home

Happy kids and a great way to feed them zucchini and applesauce!

Happy kids and a great way to feed them zucchini and applesauce!

Sharing the Bounty

Sharing the Bounty

A special shout out to a few of our shareholde families, Staabs and Garlinskis, for helping to harvest 70# of green beans which were donated to the food shelf.

A special shout out to a few of our shareholder families, Staabs and Garlinskis, for helping to harvest 70# of green beans which were donated to the food shelf. We figure if 1# feeds a family of 4 over 280 families will be served with this donation.

After harvesting last week, we knew we had way more then all of us could use. With the help of a few shareholder families, we harvested 70 pounds of green beans and 78 pounds of cucumbers that were then donated to our local food shelf. After a few estimated calculations, we figured that the green beans alone would nourish over 280 people. Thank you to the Staab and Garlinski families for your help with harvest.

The food shelf had great appreciation for the fresh produce. Thank you for helping us to feed those in need.

Garden Science

We have been reading Farmer Boy this summer. If you have read this book, you will remember where Almanzo fed his pumpkin milk to help it grow bigger then any other in the county receiving the blue ribbon at the county fair.

Well we have talked about doing this experiment for a few years, and this weekend we found time to start it and at least give it a try.

Fist we selected a pumpkin, I think we should have started a tad earlier. But nonetheless, we cut a small slit in he stem on one pumpkin and on the vine on another. Then carefully insterted a candle wick which had been soaked in milk into the slit and wrapped gauze aound the slit and candle wick.

Fist we selected a pumpkin, I think we should have started a tad earlier. But nonetheless, we cut a small slit in the stem on one pumpkin and on the vine on another. Then carefully inserted a candle wick which had been soaked in milk into the slit and wrapped gauze around the slit and candle wick.

Next, we had selected a jar and drilled a small hole in the top; threaded the wick into the hole and placed tape on the hole and wick. Then we placed it into a hole we had dug and secured it in the hole. We will check it daily to see if the milk is being absorbed.

Next, we had selected a jar and drilled a small hole in the top; threaded the wick into the hole and placed tape on the hole and wick. Then we placed it into a hole we had dug and secured it in the hole. We will check it daily to see if the milk is being absorbed.

Boxes of Produce

This list is prepared before we harvest your share. Some guesswork is involved! We do our best to predict which crops will be ready to harvest, but sometimes crops are on the list that are not in the share, and sometimes crops will be in the share even though they’re not on the list. Remember food safety in your kitchen when preparing, always wash your hands before working with your produce and always wash your produce before eating.

Black Seeded Simpson Lettuce – Some of the crops are ran under cold well water to take the field heat off of them so they last longer in your refrigerators. They are not washed – just cooled. So wash your vegetables before eating.

Red Oak Leaf Lettuce – Beautiful red lettuce leaf.

Beets

Yellow Onions

Zucchini and Summer Squash – Some insects may be getting the best of this crop. We are trying our best to figure out why some of these plants are dying off.

Cucumbers growing right behind the flower.

Cucumbers growing right behind the flower. The cucumbers are growing like crazy. If you are interested in canning some, please let us know. This past week we had so many that we donated 78 pounds of cucumbers to the food shelf.

Cucumbers – You received both varieties of cucumbers this week – new is the straight 8 variety (longer variety).

Carrots – Here is a good link to carrot recipes.

Green Beans/Purple Beans– This crop is bountiful.  If you have not been able to keep up but hate the thought of throwing them away. Try these easy blanching steps to freeze the green beans to use throughout the year.

Kohlrabi – Here are some ideas for using your Kohlrabi.

Kale – Are you still trying to figure out this vegetable? Here ae some more ideas.

Tomatoes – The tomatoes are starting to come in with a variety included in your boxes including: Yellow Girls, Roma, Fourth of July and cherry tomatoes.

Sweet Corn – One of my favorites. Here is a way to freeze the corn before it gets to old in your refrigerator.

CilantroEnjoy in salsas, fajitas, eggs and more. Learn more about cilantro here.

The boys wee happy to share some flowers with their Grandma.

The boys were happy to share some flowers with their Grandma.

Fresh cut arrangement – A variety from sunflowers, Rudbeckia, straw flowers, marigolds and zinnias.

Recipe of the Week

I thought you might enjoy hearing how some of our shareholders are eating some of their veggies.

  • Carrots and Cucumbers – slice and dip in peanut butter
  • Beets – peel and eat raw and/or in salads. I like to eat them cooked with some butter on them.
  • Kohlrabi – peel and slice then eat like an apple.